Social Graph Foo Camp–the Videos

On a stormy weekend back in February, O’Reilly hosted Social Graph Foo Camp (David Recordon and Scott Kveton were the instigators; we were happy to say “Yes” when they asked to hold the party at our Sebastopol campus). Google announced their Social Graph API on Friday morning, adding fuel to the fire as the intense discussions got underway. We managed to drag some of the Campers away from the proceedings, sit them in front of a video camera and capture their thoughts about the state of the social graph. We also included a summary in the latest issue of Release 2.0 (free excerpt). 

There’s much more to be done if we’re to create sane and useful approaches to the data portability, identity, and privacy issues created by the social networking juggernaut. The conversation continues today at the Data Sharing Workshop in San Franciso, and next week at Web 2.0 Expo, where a slew of SG Foo Campers will be speaking, including Joseph Smarr, Tom Coates, Niall Kennedy, John Musser, Gavin Bell, Artur Bergman, Ankur Shah, Kellan Elliott-McCrea, Marc Davis, Justin Hall, and Dave Morin.

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  • http://dasht-exp-1a.com Thomas Lord

    I’ve started sampling these and I intend to listen to many of them because of the importance of the issues before us but, I’m immediately struck by this:

    There are some tiny voices of concern there — smartest guys in the room shouting “we’re trying but not clearly coming even close to succeeding to wake these f’s up”. That’s the one hand.

    And then the other hand is a lot of apologists who try to coopt that rhetoric and turn it into product opportunities rather than true corrections.

    This ain’t yr pappy’s valley, folks. S and Fan have been quite well introduced, so to speak. There’s no graceful, make-money-on-the-margins “correction” here — just hard work to shovel the barn.

    “If you know what I mean.”-t

    “Money is not the problem. You have enough of that….” — Roches.

  • chris bartlet

    I had a friend who attended social graph foo. I asked what happened and was told: the men in the room obsessed on calculating the graph connections (which my friend thought was meaningless, because you can’t judge the strength of a relationship by calculation of the data we now collect.. you may talk occasionally via facebook to someone you like, would do business with and/or speak with often on the phone, and speak often on FB with someone you otherwise don’t trust, but have to talk with or in a group with, for some reason, for example).

    And the (few) women in the room wanted to talk about how the relationships people maintain can be supported with meaningful features, that can then be used based upon meaning to suss out the relationships in the graphs and to see where people really relate to each other meaningfully.

    I other words, the men wanted numbers, and more and more connections, no matter how light or meaningless, the women wanted meaningful connections, even if there were fewer of them.

    Fascinating. And my friend said there was a complete lack of ability for the men to get the women, but the women got the men. But thought they were a little obsessed with silly aspects of the problem.

    I see this a lot in tech. Funny huh, that social graph foo repeated this story again. Will watch videos to see if it’s captured there.

  • http://www.halfempty.com Marty Spellerberg

    Jeremy (most viewed #2) brings up a good point about phishing. I wonder if someone could help… last time I evangelized OpenID, someone said to me “if that ever got compromised, well…”

    I didn’t have a good answer, but I’d like one. With OpenID, what’s to stop someone from harming me on many many sites?

    Also, Leslie (most viewed #3) is super cute.

  • http://dasht-exp-1a.com Thomas Lord

    Women v. men. “super cute”

    Swell. Nice to know where we are.

    Don’t worry: other people are embarrassed and offended on yr behalf — don’t change a thing.

    -t

  • Bob Barkley

    I took a look at the video expecting to see Kaliya Hamlin. She’s dedicated the past 4 years of her life to identity systems and social interactions (you’ve renamed it “social graph” but it’s what she’s been working on), pulled together the Open ID consortium at the first Internet Identity Workshop 3 years ago from a group that didn’t want to work together and were very suspicious of each other to make the technology happen, and continues to be central in leading the community to work toward interoperable single standards for identity protocols, social graph tools and consensus across the community that builds these companies and tools.

    In other words, identity would be a very different set of technologies without her, and would be the poorer for it.

    I’m pretty shocked that David Recordon was an organizer, and works with her in the identity community, yet would fail to invite her.

    What happened?

  • http://dasht-exp-1a.com Thomas Lord

    I appreciate the edit on my last post. I wouldn’t have minded seeing the full version but I can also appreciate, well, not. Let’s call the omitted bit an exemplar of “too” over the top. :-)

    Reviewed the videos in greater depth and, nice folks, due respect all around, but… hypothesis confirmed from my perspective. Sorry to be “Debby Downer.” This is freakin’ hard to fix.

    -t