Four short links: 25 Mar 2009

IT, AI, IQ, and UK today:

  1. Definition IT — a blog about the ways in which IT is becoming a problem and not a solution. In the absence of any independent global standards or best practice models that guide the delivery of technology into businesses we have relinquished control to the suppliers of our technology. The suppliers are in a mammoth arms race to sell more products and this has become the de-facto controller for the delivery of technology into businesses. No one statement in the blog is outrageous, but they add up and indicate an industry that isn’t delivering the value it claims to.
  2. What is a Good Recommendation Algorithm? — Greg Linden starts an interesting conversation at the CACM blogs.
  3. Why Money Messes With Your Mind (New Scientist) — interesting psychological research. the volunteers who had been primed with the money-related words worked on the task for longer before asking for help. In a related experiment, people in the money-word group were also significantly less likely to help a fellow student who asked for assistance than were people in the group primed with non-money words.
  4. Obama’s Diplomatic Gift to UK Leader Fubared by DRM (BoingBoing) — we can laugh, but Obama’s team is stacked with ex-RIAA lawyers.
tags: , , ,
  • coder

    With open source in the equation, IT solves a lot of problems than it brings. I am developing a system based purely on OSS and EC2; the benefits are huge, cost nearly absent with lots to gain. IT sector innovates much rapidly than most other fields – basic research, biotech included.

  • Anonymous

    I would tend to disagree with Alan Moore. There are a number of fantastic standards that assist organizations with managing IT from a business perspective and protect against techies driving the buying cycle solely based on the next cool gadget. The leading standard developed out of the UK government is ITIL – Information Technology Infrastructure Library. http://www.itil.co.uk/.

  • Falafulu Fisi

    Quote:
    In the absence of any independent global standards or best practice models that guide the delivery of technology into businesses we have relinquished control to the suppliers of our technology.

    Yes, because the suppliers of technologies own those technologies (intellectual or tangible). It is the right of the owner to enjoy of what they own. It is called property rights which is inalienable. Advocates of Statism think otherwise, ie, that they have a right to what is not theirs which they lobby law-makers to make laws to take those rights from property owners as somehow they’re entitle to those properties. The control of those properties should primarily rest with the property owners and not the consumers or lawmakers.

    Quote:
    The suppliers are in a mammoth arms race to sell more products and this has become the de-facto controller for the delivery of technology into businesses.

    It is called free-market. I am sure that Tim O’Reilly wants to sell more books in comparison to his competitors. Is it a good thing? Yes. Selling more books will only be good for Tim’s pocket and his shareholders. Is it a crime to do so? Nope.

    Property owners have legitimate rights and consumers have no rights at all, period. The rights to one’s property must be respected by other individuals or by law. It doesn’t mean that the law violates property rights then it makes it right to do so.