Four short links: 15 March 2010

Digital Libraries, Story Analysis, Scriptable Google Apps, Forensic Rooting

  1. A German Library for the 21st Century (Der Spiegel) — But browsing in Europeana is just not very pleasurable. The results are displayed in thumbnail images the size of postage stamps. And if you click through for a closer look, you’re taken to the corresponding institute. Soon you’re wandering helplessly around a dozen different museum and library Web sites — and you end up lost somewhere between the “Vlaamse Kunstcollectie” and the “Wielkopolska Biblioteka Cyfrowa.” Would it not be preferable to incorporate all the exhibits within the familiar scope of Europeana? “We would have preferred that,” says Gradmann. “But then the museums would not have participated.” They insist on presenting their own treasures. This is a problem encountered everywhere around the world: users hate silos but institutions hate the thought of letting go of their content. We’re going to have to let go to win. (via Penny Carnaby)
  2. StoryGardena web-based tool for gathering and analyzing a large number of stories contributed by the public. The content of the stories, along with some associated survey questions, are processed in an automated semantic computing process for an immediate, interactive display for the lay public, and in a more thorough manual process for expert analysis.
  3. Google Apps Script — VBA for the 2010s. Currently mainly for spreadsheets, but some hooks into Gmail and Google Calendar.
  4. There’s a Rootkit in the Closet — lovely explanation of finding and isolating a rootkit, reconstructing how it got there and deconstructing the rootkit to figure out what it did. It’s a detective story, no less exciting than when Cliff Stohl wrote The Cuckoo’s Egg.
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  • Kaushik

    I found the “Rootkit in the Closet” story via Hackernews and most of it went over my head. However, I didn’t know the writer is the same one who wrote The Cuckoo’s Egg. I read the abridged version of the story in Reader’s Digest Book Section and absolutely loved it.

  • Nat Torkington

    @Kaushik: the writer of the blog post isn’t Cliff Stohl, but the same basic detective story plays out in both. Stohl’s book is fantastic, and well worth reading.