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Four short links: 6 July 2010

Critical Thinking, Impulse Buys, Cell Tower in a Handset, and American Jobs

  1. Critical Thinkinga world-class resource for teaching critical thinking and Internet literacies. The ability to separate bullshit from truth (to find the gold nuggets in the butt nuggets, as it were), is how people can get the good effects of the Internet while avoiding most of the bad. (via Clay Johnson)
  2. Economist Direct is a Fabulous Idea — on the Economist’s offer to let you buy a single-issue subscription: it’s not a subscription; it’s more casual than that. It’s an impulscription. (via BERG London)
  3. OpenBTS on Droid — run a GSM network from a CDMA handset, with the help of Asterisk. Cute hack!
  4. How to Make an American Job, Before It’s Too Late (Andy Grove) — former head of Intel talks about the nature of jobs and industries. A new industry needs an effective ecosystem in which technology knowhow accumulates, experience builds on experience, and close relationships develop between supplier and customer. (via timoreilly on Twitter)
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  • Steve G.

    Sadly, Economist Direct is only available in the UK.

  • Doug

    It’s unfortunate that such a hollow, grating, and meaningless buzzword like “world-class” is linked to a resource invoking critical thinking.

  • wakacje

    Must we remain bound, even through metaphor, to the textbook as a model? The economics of print technology required standardized editions that fail to reflect the fluidity of knowledge. Let’s leave the metaphor of the textbook behind us. Instead, open, networked learning should aggregate and respond to discovery and analysis in real time while drawing relevant materials from resources across a spectrum of disciplines. We can include many more voices and create much more engaging models for learning egipt last minute. Dr. Beth Harris and I created Smarthistory.org, a conversation-based multimedia art history web-book to begin to do exactly this.

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    Must we remain bound, even through metaphor, to the textbook as a model? The economics of print technology required standardized editions that fail to reflect the fluidity of knowledge. Let’s leave the metaphor of the textbook behind us. Instead, open, networked learning should aggregate and respond to discovery and analysis in real time while drawing relevant materials from resources across a spectrum of disciplines. We can include many more voices and create much more engaging models for learning best student credit cards. Dr. Beth Harris and I created Smarthistory.org, a conversation-based multimedia art history web-book to begin to do exactly this.