Four short links: 30 November 2010

Git Library, Uncocked Open Data, Role of Editorial, and Network Neutrality Salvo

  1. libgit2 — a linkable git library. Ruby and Python bindings.
  2. Open Data: How Not to Cock It Up — Tom Steinberg lays it out.
  3. Algorithm and Crowd are Not EnoughMy point isn’t that Google, Netflix, Amazon, Yelp or any of the others are doomed. But I do think there’s an opportunity brewing for entrepreneurs, websites and companies to add editorial components to the algo-crowd paradigm. O’Reilly’s business is built on editorial value, whether in book selection or conference creation. We obviously see a continued role for editorial presence. (via John Battelle on Twitter)
  4. Level 3 vs Comcast (Denver Post) — first shakedown from the carriers. Without mandated neutral carriers, the Internet will dissolve into a fiefdom of consolidated big players willing to pay the shakedowns of the telco goons.
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  • For the Level 3 vs. Comcast issue, the article is vague on details. I suspect the contract was for a flat-fee, and now that Level 3 is getting ready to double the amount of their normal traffic, Comcast is crying foul. They both probably needed to negotiate a contract based on traffic levels, not a flat-fee.