Developer Week in Review

Unix IP on the block, AT&T can't keep a secret, and take one tablet and call me in the morning

Now firmly seated in the New Year, your week in review returns to its normally scheduled programming.

No sale for Novell?

As reported in the Year in Review, Novell had plans to sell a chunk of Unix intellectual property to CPTN Holdings, a consortium that includes Microsoft, Apple, EMC and Oracle. This reopened the fear that Linux would come under patent attack. Last week, it was reported that the deal was evidently off, but according to Microsoft, it was just a procedural thing with German regulators, and the process is moving ahead according to plan.

Assuming this sale goes through, it will remain to be seen if the Gang of Four takes the next step and tries to prosecute any of the patents against the open source community. It’s possible that they intend to use them against other companies, or as protection against IP actions. But given Microsoft’s history in the SCO controversy and the company’s feelings about Linux, it is also possible that pigs will fly.

The worst kept secret in the Industry

If you haven’t heard that Apple finally inked a deal with Verizon this week, you should consider subletting the rock you’ve been hiding under. The interesting question that no one seems to be asking is if this is going to start the fractionalization of the iOS developer community. The Verizon version of the iPhone will ship with a mobile hotspot feature that the AT&T version lacks, and you can’t help but wonder if other differences will creep into the iPhone over time as different carriers put different restrictions and requirements on the platform. One of the major selling points of the iPhone is that there has been little platform diversity for developers to deal with, apart from some sensors and the iPad. If too much branching of the hardware and software platform occurs, Apple could find themselves in the same boat with Android.

We also know that certain apps were banned from the App Store because AT&T objected to them. Will apps now have to pass muster for two different carriers, or will we start to see AT&T and Verizon-only applications?

Tablets, tablets, tablets!

That yearly pilgrimage of tech-heads, CES, has ended, and the big news for software developers is that tablets appear to be the new black. Multiple vendors showed off iPad wannabes at CES, many based on Android, a few on Linux, and a few running Windows.

Smartphones have already changed how software is developed, as applications have moved away from the keyboard-and-mouse input model. But until now, desktop-level applications have still clung to the old way. As tablets start to replace notebooks and netbooks, we’re likely to see development shifts in productivity and enterprise applications that traditionally were tethered to a keyboard.

What does the future hold for those who code? My crystal ball is currently installing update 2 of 543, so I guess you’ll have to check back here next week to find out. Suggestions are always welcome, so please send tips or news here.

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