Developer Week in Review

App Store policy makes developers see red, Ubuntu may have a black heart, and a look at the blue content in git commits.

Live, via satellite from around the world, it’s Developer Week in Review, with your correspondent, Buff Overflow.

Apple policies rile developers (again)

Developers certainly seem to be getting fed up with Apple’s dictatorial control of the App Store, and the new subscription and in-app purchase restrictions may push them over the edge. If Apple wants to avoid appearing to play favorites, they will need to apply the policy uniformly, which could put some very popular iPhone apps in jeopardy. For example, you can purchase and download audio books with Audible’s app, and I can’t see them agreeing to give up 30% of their gross income to Apple for the privilege. With companies big and small screaming for blood, and the FTC threatening to take a closer look, this may be one App Store policy that needs to be put back on the shelf.

Meanwhile, Google is rolling out their own subscription model, but it’s unclear who the intended audience would be. Android apps?

Oh yah, and there’s evidently an announcement about something called an iPad 2 happening next week …

Ubuntu: Distribution on the edge?

All eyes (well, some eyes … ok, my eyes) were turned this week toward Canonical, as some reports indicate that the formerly peace-loving Linux distro may be on a path toward more business-minded actions.

Agree or disagree with the premise of the article, but it’s a good jumping off point for a conversation about just where the future of Linux distributions lie. With Ubuntu and Red Hat the two most public symbols of Linux, has the “pure” roots of Linux (such as Debian) been lost? Is Linux just another commercial operating system now, with an open source development model?

Is obscenity ruining our developers?

Your twenty-something PHP developer sits alone at a terminal, reviewing git commits. Seems innocent enough, but do you really know what your programmer is looking at? The answers may shock and disturb you.

Here’s an interesting analysis of git commit messages (not comments in code, as Slashdot erroneously reported), looking at swear frequency by programming language.

C++, Ruby and JavaScript all had about the same amount, roughly twice that of C and three times that of C# and Java. PHP and Python programmers evidently don’t swear much at all. The results were normalized, so the popularity of the languages didn’t influence the weightings. Mind you, the total percentage of commit messages with any kind of swear at all was a tiny 0.022% (210 total swears), so it’s not like it was a bar full of sailors.

That was the developer week that was. Please send tips or leads here.

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  • http://sites.google.com/site/shawnhcorey/ Shawn

    Is obscenity ruining our developers?

    And Perl programmers don’t swear at all, at least, not in code sunce there is none listed. :)

  • Developer1

    There’s no swear words in Perl simply because they don’t comment their code!

  • http://meat.net/ dbt

    There’s only swearing in perl if you count the cartoon swear words that seem to make up perl syntax, i.e. &$*!

    :)