Four short links: 24 August 2011

STM in Python, Static Web is Back, Cyberwar, and Virtual Language Education

  1. STM in PyPy — a proposal to add software transactional memory to the all-Python Python interpreter as a way of simplifying concurrent programming. I first learned about STM from Haskell’s Simon Peyton-Jones at OSCON. (via Nelson Minar)
  2. Werner Vogels’ Static Web Site on S3 — nice writeup of the toolchain to publish a web site to static files served from S3.
  3. China Inadvertently Reveals State-Sponsored Hacking — if UK, US, France, Israel, or Chinese citizens believe their government doesn’t have malware and penetration teams working on extracting information from foreign governments, they’re dreaming.
  4. MyChinese360 — virtual foreign language instruction in Mandarin, including “virtual visits” to Chinese landmarks. The ability to get native speakers virtually into the classroom makes the Internet a huge asset for rural schools. (via Lucy Gray)
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  • Rossbach et al’s study of Software Transactional Memory (http://www.neverworkintheory.org/?p=122) was really interesting: students who used it thought they had done worse than peers using conventional synchronization mechanisms, but had actually done better.