Four short links: 5 October 2011

Privacy Plugins, Dodgy SSL Spotter, Glowing Rectangles, and Huckory Hadoop

  1. Ghostery — a browser plugin to block trackers, web bugs, dodgy scripts, ads, and anything else you care to remove from your browsing experience. It looks like a very well done adblocker, but it’s done (a) closed-source and (b) for-profit. Blocking trackers is something every browser *should* do, but because browser makers make (or hope to make) money from ads, they don’t. In theory, Mozilla should do it. Even if they were to take up the mantle, though, they’re unlikely to make anything for IE or Chrome. So it’s in the hands of companies with inarticulate business models. (via Andy Baio)
  2. Perspectives — Firefox plugin that lets you know when you’ve encountered an SSL certificate that’s different from the ones that other Perspectives users see (e.g., you’re being man-in-the-middled by Iran). (via Francois Marier)
  3. Always Connected — “I’ve got a full day of staring at glowing rectangles ahead of me! Better get started …”. I have made mornings and evenings backlight-free zones in an effort to carve out some of the day free of glowing rectangles. (I do still read myself to sleep on the Kindle, though, but it’s not backlit)
  4. Is Teaching MapReduce Healthy for Students?Google’s narrow MapReduce API conflates logical semantics (define a function over all items in a collection) with an expensive physical implementation (utilize a parallel barrier). As it happens, many common cluster-wide operations over a collection of items do not require a barrier even though they may require all-to-all communication. But there’s no way to tell the API whether a particular Reduce method has that property, so the runtime always does the most expensive thing imaginable in distributed coordination: global synchronization. Detailed and interesting criticism of whether Hadoop is the BASIC of parallel tools. (via Pete Warden)
tags: , , , , ,
  • http://paulmwatson.com Paul M. Watson

    “Blocking trackers is something every browser *should* do”

    Why? I fully agree we should be aware of and put in better control of trackers but out right default blocking doesn’t seem like a well thought through idea for the web.

  • cory

    the original version of ghostery was open source. it’s available at the author’s github page here: https://github.com/jonpierce/ghostery

  • http://www.ghostery.com Alexei

    Re “inarticulate business models”:

    Please see http://purplebox.ghostery.com/?p=1016020665