February 2012 Archives

The ebook evolution

The fifth in a series looking at the major themes of this year's TOC conference.

Several overriding themes permeated this year's Tools of Change for Publishing conference. The final piece in a series looking at five of the major themes, here we take a look at the ebook evolution, from data on how readers acquire and consume ebooks to platform and format trends and predictions.

Report from HIMSS 12: wrap-up of the largest health IT conference

Recalcitrant instincts that depressed me and progressive suggestions that restored me. Details DICOM, Watson, and other interesting projects.

Customized self-publishing is the future of textbooks

John Conley on where the textbook sector is headed.

In this TOC podcast, John Conley, vice president of publishing and commercial print at Xerox, talks about the textbook market today and what's coming down the road.

Four short links: 29 February 2012

Four short links: 29 February 2012

StuxNet Deep Dive, Museum 3D Scanning, Tracking The Trackers, and HTML5 Game Code

  1. StuxNet Deep Dive — extremely technical talk, but this page has a redux. The presenter’s thesis, well-argued, is that StuxNet was absolutely aimed specifically at the Natanz facility. (via Chris Douglas)
  2. Smithsonian Digitizing Items (CNet) — two-person project, only able to do a few items a year, but still an excellent advance. See also Bronwyn Holloway-Smith’s art project around artifact replicas.
  3. Collusion (Mozilla) — have your browser tell you the third parties tracking your web browsing. (via Hacker News)
  4. Survivor (Github) — HTML5 implementation of an Atari/C64 game. If you wanted to learn how to write HTML5 arcade games, you could do worse than study this project. (via Andy Baio)

Discovery and data go hand in hand

The fourth in a series looking at the major themes of this year's TOC conference.

Several overriding themes permeated this year's Tools of Change for Publishing conference. The fourth in a series looking at five of the major themes, here we take a look at discovery in publishing.

The privacy arc

How do we build satisfying connections back into our lives without the superficiality of automated sharing?

We're at a point in privacy's evolution where sanitized tech solutions are clumsily attempting to introduce (or reintroduce) human connections into our experiences.

Four short links: 28 February 2012

Four short links: 28 February 2012

REST Interfaces, Browser History, Crappy Textbooks, and Wireless Babies

  1. Designing RESTful Interfaces (Slideshare) — extremely good presentation on how to build HTTP APIs.
  2. Manipulating History for Fun and Profit — if you want to make websites that are AJAX-responsive but without breaking the back button or preventing links, read this.
  3. Why Textbooks Are So Broken (Salon) — Let’s say a publisher hires a developer for a certain low-bid fee to produce seven supplemental math books for grades 3-8. The product specs call for each student book and teacher guide to have page counts of roughly 100 pages and 80 pages, respectively. The publisher wants these seven books ready for press in five weeks—over 1,400 pages. To put this in perspective, in the not too recent past at least six months would be allotted for a project of this size. But publishers customarily shrink their deadlines to get a jump on the competition, especially in today’s math market. Unreasonable turnaround times are part of the new normal, something that almost guarantees a lack of quality right out of the gate.
  4. exmobaby — wireless biosensor baby pyjamas send ECG, skin temperature, and movement data via Zigbee. (via Jo Komisarczuk)

Business models to monetize publishing in the digital era

The third in a series looking at the major themes of this year's TOC conference.

Several overriding themes permeated this year's Tools of Change for Publishing conference. The third in a series looking at five major themes, here we look at monetization in publishing, including subscription/access models, freemium, and ad-based models.

Creating Maker-friendly cities

Cities should encourage homebrew innovation and inspiration.

Governments, particularly local governments, need to do more to understand and adapt to what might be called DIY citizenship.

Story first, interactivity second

Jos Carlyle on creating successful children's book apps.

In this TOC podcast, Persian Cat Press creative director Jos Carlyle talks about the company's new book, "The Gift," and what goes into building a successful children's book app.