Four short links: 27 September 2012

Don't Pay Developers, Teaching Programming, Second Android Screens, and Democracy

  1. Paying for Developers is a Bad Idea (Charlie Kindel) — The companies that make the most profit are those who build virtuous platform cycles. There are no proof points in history of virtuous platform cycles being created when the platform provider incents developers to target the platform by paying them. Paying developers to target your platform is a sign of desperation. Doing so means developers have no skin in the game. A platform where developers do not have skin in the game is artificially propped up and will not succeed in the long run. A thesis illustrated with his experience at Microsoft.
  2. Learnable Programming (Bret Victor) — deconstructs Khan Academy’s coding learning environment, and explains Victor’s take on learning to program. A good system is designed to encourage particular ways of thinking, with all features carefully and cohesively designed around that purpose. This essay will present many features! The trick is to see through them — to see the underlying design principles that they represent, and understand how these principles enable the programmer to think. (via Layton Duncan)
  3. Tablet as External Display for Android Smartphones — new app, in beta, letting you remote-control via a tablet. (via Tab Times)
  4. Clay Shirky: How The Internet Will (One Day) Transform Government (TED Talk) — There’s no democracy worth the name that doesn’t have a transparency move, but transparency is openness in only one direction, and being given a dashboard without a steering wheel has never been the core promise a democracy makes to its citizens.
tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
  • ehjxgcth

    Yes, by all means choose an idea that’s so cool that people will run to do the “work” for free. Then you can make millions. Yeah, that’s the ticket. Like I’m going to start a blog on eating chocolate and I’ll get my writers to eat chocolate all day long and then poke their chocolate stained fingers at the keyboard all night long. Yeah, that’s the ticket.

    Every platform takes an investment. Even the iPhone required plenty of infrastructure investment from Apple before they could open it up. And given how closely Apple polices the apps and how few sales many apps generate, it’s clear that Apple is heavily subsidizing the platform today. Those cubicle farms filled with people checking app costs money.