Four short links: 12 October 2012

Designers and Coders, Randomised Parachute Trials, Testing HTML5 Features, and Backbone Book

  1. Code Talks and Designers Don’t Speak the Language (Crystal Beasley) — Many of the bugs, however, require a deep understanding of why the product exists in the marketplace and a thorough understanding of the research that underpins the project. These strategic questions are analogous to what a software architect would do. I was on the Persona project full time for three months before I felt confident making significant choices about UX.
  2. Parachute use to prevent death and major trauma related to gravitational challenge: systematic review of randomised controlled trials (British Medical Journal) — you don’t need to subscribe to appreciate this.
  3. html5test — see how the browsers stack up in features and compliance.
  4. Backbone FundamentalsA creative-commons book on Backbone.js for beginners and advanced users alike.
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  • Joe

    Re: #1 – I’ve always noted that the job of the analyst is to determine what things are constant and what things are variable, and the coder codes to it. The very first bug happens when the first customer sees the product and asks for one of the constants to become a variable. Every bug that follows is because of the coder attempting to fix that first bug.