Data journalism and social media merge, a call-out for ‘crap’ data journalism, and tips for creating a data resume.

I suppose it was only a matter of time before the worlds of data journalism and social media cozied up and got comfortable.  The London office of the Trinity Mirror announced that their new initiative, Mysterious Project Y, will focus on creating data journalism that will be compelling to share on the social Web. The site will focus on visualizations; “charts, graphs, facts, and figures” that “people care passionately about.”

You may have heard the statistic floating around lately that it is more difficult to land a job at a new location of the supermarket chain Wegmans than it is to gain admittance to Harvard University.  The dragonflyeye blog refutes the numbers, and says that the story is an example of “crap data journalism.” Ouch.

Poynter highlights this YouTube offering by Professor Matt Waite of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, sharing tips on landing a coveted job in data journalism with a forward-thinking data resume.

The African Investigative Journalism Conference wrapped up this week in South Africa, and as even more evidence of the rapidly-growing global influence of data-driven storytelling, the conference featured 27 different sessions on data journalism and enhancing investigations with computer assisted reporting. The data team was led by Ron Nixon of The New York Times.

And finally, Liz Lucas of the Investigative Reporters and Editors blog lists ten irrefutable and nonnegotiable rules of responsible data journalism.

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