Four short links: 4 October 2013

Neuromancer Game, Ray Ozzie, Sentiment Analysis, and Open Science Prizes

  1. Case and Molly, a Game Inspired by Neuromancer (Greg Borenstein) — On reading Neuromancer today, this dynamic feels all too familiar. We constantly navigate the tension between the physical and the digital in a state of continuous partial attention. We try to walk down the street while sending text messages or looking up GPS directions. We mix focused work with a stream of instant message and social media conversations. We dive into the sudden and remote intimacy of seeing a family member’s face appear on FaceTime or Google Hangout. “Case and Molly” uses the mechanics and aesthetics of Neuromancer’s account of cyberspace/meatspace coordination to explore this dynamic.
  2. Rethinking Ray Ozziean inescapable conclusion: Ray Ozzie was right. And Microsoft’s senior leadership did not listen, certainly not at the time, and perhaps not until it was too late. Hear, hear!
  3. Recursive Deep Models for Semantic Compositionality
    Over a Sentiment Treebank
    (PDF) — apparently it nails sentiment analysis, and will be “open sourced”. At least, according to this GigaOm piece, which also explains how it works.
  4. PLoS ASAP Award Finalists Announced — with pointers to interviews with the finalists, doing open access good work like disambiguating species names and doing open source drug discovery.
tags: , , , , , , , , ,
  • Atiqur Rahman Arman

    ProShark Mobile Application Development

    Just in case you missed some of the
    pertinent facts regarding application development for mobile platforms, here
    are a few that may catch your attention.

    72% of adult Cellphone users text messages

    65% of adult Cellphone users sleep with their phones

    50% of US Cellphones will be smart phones by Christmas
    2011

    1 out of 3 Yelp searches is from mobile

    Apple Will Sell $2B in Apps in 2011

    Approximately 40% of social media users access their
    accounts through mobile devices.

    One billion mobile applications were downloaded in the
    week between Christmas Day and New Years Day – Flurry Analytics

    The total global mobile applications market is expected
    to be worth $25 billion by 2015 (up from about $6.8 billion in 2010) –
    Marketsand Markets

    Go to::>> http://proshark.com/