How to experience OSCON Amsterdam 2015

Find your way through OSCON with these four learning paths.

Paths by Francesca Gallo on Flickr. Used under a Creative Commons License.

The open source movement has been with us for almost two decades, and it’s clear that open source is now a de facto choice for software engineers across the globe. The content that you’ll find at OSCON is a reflection of that fact.

The open source world and OSCON itself are vast. With 48 sessions over two days and a bonus day with 11 workshops to choose from, you’ll no doubt have some tough choices to make when you attend the event. Keeping that in mind, I put together four learning paths that encompass the hot topics and important transitions we’re covering at OSCON.

I’m looking forward to seeing you at OSCON in Amsterdam in October! Read more…


Better code is cheaper

Implementing software quality standards guarantees measurable results.


Listen to the podcast Better code is cheaper to learn how the Software Improvement Group (SIG) is paving the way for software quality and maintainability.

Software quality is an often-overlooked development parameter, making way for those items that resonate outside of the engineering team – a faster schedule and an on-budget project. Joost Visser, Head of Research at Software Improvement Group (SIG) sat down with me to explain how a focus on quality helps to achieve the fastest possible schedules and lowest possible cost of development and maintenance.

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Everyone is a beginner at something

Becoming confident with the fundamentals.


Choose your Learning Path. Our new Learning Paths will help you get where you want to go, whether it’s learning a programming language, developing new skills, or getting started with something entirely new.

I’ve noticed a curious thing about the term “beginner.” It’s acquired a sort of stigma — we seem to most often identify ourselves by what we’re an expert in, as if our burgeoning interests/talents have less value. An experienced PHP person who is just starting Python, for example, would rarely describe herself as a “Python Beginner” on a conference badge or biography. There are exceptions, of course, people eager to talk about what they’re learning; but, on the whole, it’s not something we see much.

I work on the Head First content, and first noticed it there. You suggest to a Java developer looking to learn Ruby that she check out our Head First Ruby. “But I know programming,” she’s likely to reply, “I’m not a beginner, I just need to learn Ruby.” People, by and large, buy into the stigma of being a “beginner,” which is, frankly, silly. Everyone is a beginner at something.

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Coding in a cloud-based enterprise

Mapping the future of development by designing for distributed architectures.


With the advent of DevOps and various Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) environments, many complex business requirements need to be met within a much shorter timeframe. The Internet of Things (IoT) is also changing how established applications and infrastructures are constructed. As a result of these converging trends, the enterprise IT landscape is becoming increasingly distributed, and the industry is starting to map how all the various components — from networking and middleware platforms, to ERP systems and microservices — will come together to create a new development paradigm that exists solely in the cloud.

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Batten down the hatches

Four core questions that every security team must ask itself to develop its strategy in dealing with attacks.

Massive software vulnerabilities have been surfacing with increasingly high visibility, and the world’s computer administrators are repeatedly thrust into the cycle of confusion, anxiety, patching and waiting for the Next Big One. The list of high profile vulnerabilities in widely used software packages and platforms continues to rise. A recent phenomenon has researchers borrowing from the National Hurricane Center’s tradition, to introduce a vulnerability with a formal name. Similar to hurricanes and weather scientists, security researchers, analysts, and practitioners observe and track vulnerabilities as more details unfold and the true extent of the risk (and subsequent damage) is known.

Take for example the Android vulnerability released at the beginning of August, 20151. This vulnerability, named “Stagefright” after its eponymous application, can lead to remote code execution (RCE) through several vectors including MMS, Email, HTTP, Media applications, Bluetooth, and more. These factors coupled with the fact that at its release there were no approved patches available for upwards of 95% of the world’s mobile Android footprint means the vulnerability is serious — especially to any organization with a significant Android population.

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Parallax scrolling for iOS with Swift and Sprite Kit

Learn how to add this popular visual effect to your iOS project.

Up until the mid 1990s, the pinnacle of video game graphics was parallax scrolling: the use of multiple scrolling backgrounds, which created a sense of depth and perspective in the game. When you’re being a 2D game in Sprite Kit, you can create this effect by creating multiple sprites, and managing their position over time.

In this example, we’re creating a scene where there are four components, listed in order of proximity:

  • A dirt path
  • Some nearby hills
  • Some further distant hills
  • The sky

You can see the final scene below:

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