ENTRIES TAGGED "anonymity"

Planning a better whistleblowers' site: a review of Domscheit-Berg's book "Inside WikiLeaks"

Commentators tend to treat WikiLeaks as some kind of pure emanation of
the Internet, ignoring the vast legal, financial, media, and other
systems that make it possible. Second, they either praise or criticize
its mission, but rarely ask how it could be improved. For these
reasons, I find Daniel Domscheit-Berg’s new book, Inside
WikiLeaks
, an important contribution to current politics.

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Pew Research asks questions about the Internet in 2020

Pew Research asks questions about the Internet in 2020

Will Google Make Us Stupid? Will we live in the cloud or the desktop?

Pew Research, which seems to be interested in just about everything, conducts a "future of the Internet" survey every few years in which they throw outrageously open-ended and provocative questions at a chosen collection of observers in the areas of technology and society. I took the exercise as a chance to hammer home my own choices of issues, like: Will Google make us stupid? and Will we live in the cloud or the desktop?

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Being online: Conclusion–identity narratives

Identity online is created by combining many discrete items into a
coherent picture. This concluding section of the article suggests that
Social networking gives individuals more control over the picture.

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Being online: Group identities and social network identities

Groups take on their own identities online, and social networks
threaten to subsume individual identities into groups. This section
of the identity article explores grouping in all its online facets.

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Being online: Forged identities and non-identities

Creating a fake identity used to be more popular than it is now, but
some people have still hidden who they are when going online. This
section of the identity article covers some ways they do it.

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Being online: What you say about yourself, or selves

Sociological research about online participation says more about the
fringes of identity than everyday activity. This section of the
identity article explores how we present unified or fragmented selves.

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Being online: Your identity to advertisers–it's not all about you

Advertisers collect information on us for two reasons: to target us as
individuals and to place us in collective categories of consumers.
This section of the identity article coves a few of their techniques.

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Being online: Your identity online–getting down to basics

What men daily do, not knowing what they do!
The Internet provides minimal information about us when we go online,
but compensates by providing immediate, dynamic exploitation of that
information. This post in the identity article series shows what we tell
others just by connecting to the Internet. Previous posts in this series explored the various identifies that track you in real life. Now we can look at the traits that constitute your identity online. A little case study may show how fluid these are.

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Being online: Your identity in real life–what people know

Professional investigators can find out more than most people realize
about individuals. This section of the identity article introduces how
investigators do their work, on and off the Internet.

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Being online: identity, anonymity, and all things in between

To be or not to be: that is the question.
Hamlet’s famous utterance plays a trick on theater-goers, a mind game of the same type he inflicted constantly on his family and his court. While diverting his audience’s attention with a seemingly simple choice between being and non-being, Hamlet of all people would know very well how these extremes bracket infinite gradations. Our fascination with Hamlet is precisely his instinct for presenting a different self to almost everyone he met. Social networking gives us an impetus to review how we appear online. When people ask who we are, questions multiply far beyond the capacity of a binary “to be” digit.

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