ENTRIES TAGGED "API"

Four short links: 15 March 2012

Four short links: 15 March 2012

Javascript STM, HTML5 Game Mashup, BerkeleyDB Architecture, and API Ontologies

  1. atomize.jsa distributed Software Transactional Memory implementation in Javascript.
  2. mari0 — not only a great demonstration of what’s possible in web games, but also a clever mashup of Mario and Portal.
  3. Lessons From BerkeleyDB — chapter on BerkeleyDB’s design, architecture, and development philosophy from Architecture of Open Source Applications. (via Pete Warden)
  4. An API Ontology I currently see most real-world deployed APIs fit into a few different categories. All have their pros and cons, and it’s important to see how they relate to one other.
Comments: 2

Profile of the Data Journalist: The API Architect

Jacob Harris is building APIs and data into elections coverage at the New York Times.

To learn more about the people who are redefining the practice computer-assisted reporting, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, Radar conducted a series of email interviews with data journalists during the 2012 NICAR Conference.

Comment

Six API predictions for 2012

In the year to come, APIs will continue to transform into core business tools.

Among the key API trends to watch in 2012: enterprise APIs will go mainstream, data-centric APIs will become common, and APIs will need to be optimized for mobile apps and developers.

Comments: 4
Top Stories: November 21-25, 2011

Top Stories: November 21-25, 2011

The danger of SOPA, lessons from a Starbucks social experiment, and why the real world is writable.

This week on O'Reilly: Alex Howard explored the implications of SOPA and PROTECT IP, Jonathan Stark looked back on his Starbucks card experiment, and Terry Jones explained how APIs can help publishers.

Comment
Four short links: 16 September 2011

Four short links: 16 September 2011

Gamification Critique, Google+ API, Time Series Visualization, and SQL on Map-Reduce

  1. A Quick Buck by Copy and Paste — scorching review of O’Reilly’s Gamification by Design title. tl;dr: reviewer, he does not love. Tim responded on Google Plus. Also on the gamification wtfront, Mozilla Open Badges. It talks about establishing a part of online identity, but to me it feels a little like a Mozilla Open Gradients project would: cargocult-confusing the surface for the substance.
  2. Google + API Launched — first piece of a Google + API is released. It provides read-only programmatic access to people, posts, checkins, and shares. Activities are retrieved as triples of (subject, verb, object), which is semweb cute and ticks the social object box, but is unlikely in present form to reverse Declining numbers of users.
  3. Cube — open source time-series visualization software from Square, built on MongoDB, Node, and Redis. As Artur Bergman noted, the bigger news might be that Square is using MongoDB (known meh).
  4. Tenzing — an SQL implementation on top of Map/Reduce. Tenzing supports a mostly complete SQL implementation (with several extensions) combined with several key characteristics such as heterogeneity, high performance, scalability, reliability, metadata awareness, low latency, support for columnar storage and structured data, and easy extensibility. Tenzing is currently used internally at Google by 1000+ employees and serves 10000+ queries per day over 1.5 petabytes of compressed data. In this paper, we describe the architecture and implementation of Tenzing, and present benchmarks of typical analytical queries. (via Raphaël Valyi)
Comment
Strata Week: What happens when 200,000 hard drives work together?

Strata Week: What happens when 200,000 hard drives work together?

IBM is building a massive 120-petabyte array and Infochimps releases a unified geo schema.

IBM takes data storage to a whole new level (120 petabytes, to be exact), Infochimps' new API tries to make life easier for geo developers, and the "Internet of people" keeps an eye on Hurricane Irene.

Comments: 2
Four short links: 1 September 2011

Four short links: 1 September 2011

Android Charting, Illusion of Insight, Mapping API, and Science Storytelling

  1. A Chart Engine — Android charting engine.
  2. The Illusion of Asymmetric Insight — we are driven to create and form groups and then believe others are wrong just because they are others.
  3. Urban Mapping API — add rich geographic data to web and non-web applications.
  4. Tell Us A Story, Victoria — a university science story-telling contest.
Comment
Scaling Google+

Scaling Google+

Joseph Smarr of Google+ on early lessons, an API, and pseudonyms.

In a recent interview, Google's Joseph Smarr discussed what he's learned from Google+ thus far. Specifically: how quickly the social network has scaled, the importance of the user interface, and future plans for a Google+ API.

Comments: 2
Four short links: 13 June 2011

Four short links: 13 June 2011

Remote Fingerprint Scans, Playdough Circuits, Update-Sync, and Tweet Failage

  1. AIRPrint — prototype box scans a fingerprint from six feet away. (via Greg Linden)
  2. Squishy Circuits — teaching electronic circuits with conductive and insulating playdough. (via Hacker News)
  3. GraphLab — alternative take on Map-Reduce, called Update-Sync, where tasks run on connected sets of nodes rather than on one node at a time.
  4. Tower Bridge Closed — the @towerbridge account was a cute hack from Tom Armitage, whereby the public site for the London Tower Bridge was scraped and connected to Twitter, so you would see tweets like “I am closing after the MV Dixie has passed Upstream” and get a feel for the ambient activity in your city. Twitter turned over @towerbridge to the most tediously vomit-in-your-own-mouth-they’re-so-anodyne beige corporate tweets ever (account description: “Leading tourist attraction situated inside Tower Bridge”, sample tweet: “Looking for something to do it the City this weekend, check out http://www.visitthecity.co.uk/ and you’re always welcome at @TowerBridge”) and deleted the past history of tweets. Way to embrace the community of engaged passionate fans, guys! Welcome to Twitter, try not to step in your social media strategy as you cross the threshold–oh no, too late.
Comments Off
Four short links: 18 May 2011

Four short links: 18 May 2011

Future Libraries, Innovation History, Entity Extraction API, and Outside Insight

  1. The Future of the Library (Seth Godin) — We need librarians more than we ever did. What we don’t need are mere clerks who guard dead paper. Librarians are too important to be a dwindling voice in our culture. For the right librarian, this is the chance of a lifetime. Passionate railing against a straw man. The library profession is diverse, but huge numbers of them are grappling with the new identity of the library in a digital age. This kind of facile outside-in “get with the Internet times” message is almost laughably displaying ignorance of actual librarians, as much as “the book is dead!” displays ignorance of books and literacy. Libraries are already much more than book caves, and already see themselves as navigators to a world of knowledge for people who need that navigation help. They disproportionately serve the under-privileged, they are public spaces, they are brave and constant battlers at the front line of freedom to access information. This kind of patronising “wake up and smell the digital roses!” wank is exactly what gives technologists a bad name in other professions. Go back to your tribes of purple cows, Seth, and leave librarians to get on with helping people find, access, and use information.
  2. An Old Word for a New World (PDF) — paper on how “innovation”, which used to be pejorative, came now to be laudable. (via Evgeny Mozorov)
  3. AlchemyAPI — free (as in beer) entity extraction API. (via Andy Baio)
  4. Referrals by LinkedIn — the thing with social software is that outsiders can have strong visibility into the success of your software, in a way that antisocial software can’t.
Comments: 4