ENTRIES TAGGED "app"

Four short links: 19 November 2012

Four short links: 19 November 2012

Mac git tool, Web Developer Tool, Bullshit Detector, and ISPs Join Devil For Baby-Eating Orgy

  1. Wing Man — Mac app for source control management with git, implements workflow rather than simply being a wrapper for git commandlines.
  2. CodeKit — Mac app for web developers, automates (invisibly, thanks to watching filesystem changes) much of the web site tools.
  3. LazyTruth — Chrome plugin for gmail that detects bogus forwarded email and gives you the option to reply with the truth. RoboSnopes for the win! (via The Atlantic)
  4. Verizon to Throttle Pirates (BBC) — unable to solve their business model problems though the courts, Hollywood “partners” with ISPs to extra-judicially punish alleged infractions. ISPs win when heavy downloaders are throttled, of course, because it lets them have higher contention ratios (sell the same upstream cable to many more downstream email-checking residences instead of just a few torrenters). These five ISPs are mall-cops, private tax collectors, and regional monopolists, all in one nasty bundle of evil.
Comment: 1 |

Where are the apps for ereaders?

Developers and ereader vendors are missing an app opportunity

I read on my GlowLight NOOK much more frequently than I read on my Asus Transformer tablet. I’d say there’s at least a 10:1 differential, so for every hour I read on my tablet I read at least 10 hours on my Glowlight Nook. I’ll bet I’m not alone and people who own both an E Ink…
Read Full Post | Comments: 6 |
Four short links: 22 May 2012

Four short links: 22 May 2012

Budget App, Health Insurance Data, Perl Release, and HTML5 WYSIWYG Editor

  1. New Zealand Government Budget App — when the NZ budget is announced, it’ll go live on iOS and Android apps. Tablet users get details, mobile users get talking points and speeches. Half-political, but an interesting approach to reaching out to voters with political actions.
  2. Health Care Data Dump (Washington Post) — 5B health insurance claims (attempted anonymized) to be released. Researchers will be able to access that data, largely using it to probe a critical question: What makes health care so expensive?
  3. Perl 5.16.0 Out — two epic things here: 590k lines of changes, and announcement quote from Auden. Auden is my favourite poet, Perl my favourite programming language.
  4. WYSIHTML5 (GitHub) — wysihtml5 is an open source rich text editor based on HTML5 technology and the progressive-enhancement approach. It uses a sophisticated security concept and aims to generate fully valid HTML5 markup by preventing unmaintainable tag soups and inline styles.
Comment |
Developer Week in Review: 2012 preview edition

Developer Week in Review: 2012 preview edition

A look at the developer stories that will define 2012.

It's a brand new year, time to look ahead to the stories that will have developers talking in 2012. Mobile will remain a hot topic, the cloud is absorbing everything, and jobs appear to be heading back to the U.S.

Read Full Post | Comment |
Intellectual property gone mad

Intellectual property gone mad

Sweeping patent changes aren't likely, but small solutions may curb patent trolls.

Patent trolling could undermine app ecosystems, but who can mount a legitimate challenge? Here's four potential solutions.

Read Full Post | Comments: 11 |
Four short links: 6 June 2011

Four short links: 6 June 2011

Paper App, Retro Net Simulation, Games Creator, Beginning Large-Scale Machine Learning

  1. Turning Receipts into Paper Apps (BERG London) — I love the idea of the modern web app sensibility bleeding back into the world, the same way classic offline design has informed online.
  2. Telehack — an amazing interactive reconstruction of the early net, part nostalgia part game part simulation. Check out the README for more details. (via Andy Baio)
  3. Stencyl — free Flash games creation tool. Brilliant because they’re creating and owning a corresponding market for in-game assets (icons, sounds, etc.). (via Andy Baio)
  4. Introductory Machine Learning Resources (Quora) — collection of pointers for beginners. (via Joshua Schachter)
Comments Off |
And the BAFTA goes to … an app?

And the BAFTA goes to … an app?

For the first time, an app has been nominated for a TV BAFTA.

"The Malcolm Tucker: The Missing Phone" application has been nominated for a TV British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) award. Henry Volans, head of Faber Digital, discusses the app and why he thinks it's being honored with the nomination.

Read Full Post | Comments Off |
Putting conference distractions to good use

Putting conference distractions to good use

The Donahue app aims to sync conference presenters and audiences.

A new app created by Tim Meaney, partner at Arc90, and Christopher Fahey, founding partner at Behavior Design, taps into and harnesses conference distraction. Here's how it works.

Read Full Post | Comments Off |
Four short links: 25 April 2011

Four short links: 25 April 2011

Healthcare Data, C64 Emulator, Python Machine Learning, and Startup Success Stats

  1. E-Referral Evaluation Interim Findings — in general good, but note this: The outstanding system issues are an ongoing source of frustration and concern, including [...] automated data uptake from the GP [General Practitioner=family doctor] PMS [Patient Management System], that sometimes has clearly inaccurate or contradictory information. When you connect systems, you realize the limitations of the data in them.
  2. c64iphone (GitHub) — the source to an iPhone/iPad app from the store, released under GPLv3. It incorporates the Frodo emulator. Sweet Freedom.
  3. mlpy — machine learning Python library, a high-performance Python package for predictive modeling. It makes extensive use of NumPy to provide fast N-dimensional array manipulation and easy integration of C code. (via Joshua Schachter)
  4. What is The Truth Behind 9 Out of 10 Startups Fail? (Quora) — some very interesting pointers and statistics, such as Hall and Woodward (2007) analyze a dataset of all VC-backed firms and show the highly skewed distribution of outcomes. VC revenue averages $5 million per VC-backed company. Founding team averages $9 million per VC-backed company (most from small probability of great success). The economically rational founding team would sell at time of VC funding for $900,000 to avoid the undiversified risk. (via Hacker News)
Comments Off |
Four short links: 22 April 2011

Four short links: 22 April 2011

Markov Logic Networks, Social News, Content Liberation, Rate Limiting Traffic

  1. Tuffy — a GPL v3 licensed Markov Logic Network inference engine in Java and PostgreSQL that claims to be more scalable than previous tools. (via Hacker News)
  2. Behind news.meif you are curious to see what they are reading, if you want to see the world through their eyes, News.me is for you. Many people curate their Twitter experience to reflect their own unique set of interests. News.me offers a window into their curated view of the world, filtered for realtime social relevance via the bit-rank algorithm. A friend and I have been using Instapaper for this, and I’m keen to see how it works. It’s interesting, though: the more people I “share” with, the less insight I get into any one person–it goes from being a mindmeld to ambient zeitgeist.
  3. Orbital ContentContent shifting allows a user to take a piece of content that they’ve identified in one context and make it available in another. [...] Calling Instapaper a content shifter tells only half the story. It puts too much attention on the shifting and not enough on what needs to happen before a piece of content can be shifted. Before content can be shifted, it must be correctly identified, uprooted from its source, and tied to a user. This process, which I call “content liberation” is the common ground between Instapaper, Svpply, Readability, Zootool, and other bookmarklet apps. Content shifting, as powerful as it is, is just the beginning of what’s possible when content is liberated. I think they’re optimistic about liberation retaining attribution (there needs to be compelling self-interest to retain attribution) but otherwise love this piece. (via Courtney Johnston)
  4. Rate Limiting Traffic with Varnish (Dan Singerman) — I love that the technology which help you deliver web pages quickly also helps you deliver them not too quickly. (via John Clegg).

Comments Off |