ENTRIES TAGGED "app store"

Four short links: 17 June 2011

Four short links: 17 June 2011

Gamification Critique, BitCoin Trojan, App Store Abandonment, and SSD Rant

  1. Don’t Play Games With Me — slides from an excellent talk about games and gamification. (via Andy Baio)
  2. All Your Bitcoins Are Ours (Symantec) — a trojan in the wild that targets the wallet.dat file and transfers your bitcoins out. If you use Bitcoins, you have the option to encrypt your wallet and we recommend that you choose a strong password for this in the event that an attacker is attempting to brute-force your wallet open. (via Hacker News)
  3. FT Escapes the App Trap (Simon Phipps) — Financial Times dropping their iOS app and moving to HTML5, to escape the App Store commissions. As Simon points out, they’re also losing the sales channel benefits of the App Store. Facebook are doing similar. (via Tim O’Reilly)
  4. Artur Bergman on SSDs (video) — a short sweary rant he gave at Velocity, laying out the numbers for why you’re an idiot not to use SSDs.

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10 ways to botch a mobile app

10 ways to botch a mobile app

Give your mobile app a better shot at success by avoiding these common mistakes.

With the aim of injecting reason and business know-how into the app development process, "App Savvy" author Ken Yarmosh outlines the top 10 reasons why apps often falter or fail.

Comments: 13
Four short links: 25 May 2011

Four short links: 25 May 2011

DoD Open Source Report, Kinect Javascript, Open Core, and Anti-App Store

  1. OTD Lessons Learned v1 (PDF) — Dept of Defense report on use of open technologies. Advocates against forking open source projects, and provides specific guidance for groups looking to use OSS so they can navigate the military’s producement policies and procedures in a way that’ll deliver the best chance of success for the project. Imagine if only the manufacturer of a rifle were allowed to clean, fix, modify or upgrade that rifle. The military often finds itself in this position with taxpayer funded, contractor developed software: one contractor with a monopoly on the knowledge of a military software system and control of the software source code. (via John Scott)
  2. depth.js — Javascript for Chrome and Safari that lets the Kinect interact with web pages. (via Javascript Weekly)
  3. A Liberating Betrayal (Simon Phipps) — Microsoft have told Digium (makers of Asterisk) that they can’t sell their Asterisk-Skype interaction module after July 26. Simon notes that this reveals the fundamental problem with “open core” approaches to open source business. The proprietary interests hold all the cards here. The community can’t just “rehost and carry on” because the crucial add-on is proprietary. Even if wasn’t, the protocol it’s implementing is proprietary and subject to arbitrary change – very likely to happen if anyone attempts to reverse-engineer the interface and protocol. Asterisk may be open source, but if you’re dependent on this interface to connect with your customers on Skype you’ve no freedoms – that’s the way “open core” works.
  4. Zero InstallZero Install is a decentralised cross-distribution software installation system. Just hit 1.0. (via James Williams)
Comment: 1
Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

Amazon buys itself a lawsuit, a setting Sun.com, and the new name in databases

What's in a name? For Amazon's new Appstore, it was a lawsuit. For Oracle's sun.com domain, big money. And would MySQL by any other name smell as sweet?

Comments: 3
Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

App Store policy makes developers see red, Ubuntu may have a black heart, and a look at the blue content in git commits.

Coming up on the Week in Review: Revolt of the App Store developers, Ubuntu's innocence lost, and a report we swear you'll like.

Comments: 3
Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

Tomcat purrs, Amazon dictates, and HTML5 brands

In this edition of Developer Week in Review: there's a new Tomcat in town; Amazon sets app prices; and HTML5 may be a work in progress, but now it's got a logo.

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Four short links: 9 November 2010

Four short links: 9 November 2010

A Prototyping HowTo, Decolumning PDFs, Real World Social Networks, and App Search

  1. How to Prototype and Influence People (Aza Raskin) — I’m fascinated lately by prototypes, mockups, tangible artifacts, and other design tools for conveying the essence and promise of something without having to build it all. This talk nails it.
  2. paper2ebook — Utility to re-structure research papers published in US Letter or A4 format PDF files to remove the 2 columns layout to make it suitable for viewing in an ebook reader. (via Olivier Grisel on Twitter)
  3. The Real Life Social Network (Slideshare) — presentation from a Google ux designer starts with a typical “social networking makes you lump everyone as a friend but people don’t think that way” set of slides, but by slide 70 it’s talking about research into how people think of their friends. I’d love to see a UI for a social network that got this right. (via Matt Zimmerman on Twitter)
  4. uquery — simple search engine for the iPhone/iPad app store. (via Marco Arment on Twitter)
Comment: 1

Windows Mobile apps are more expensive than iPhone apps

The mean app price for the Windows market is nearly two times higher than the App Store.

The Windows Marketplace for Mobile now has about 1,400 apps spread across 16 categories. In this short post I'll provide some basic statistics and compare it with the grandaddy of app stores: the U.S. iTunes store.

Comments: 30
Four short links: 21 October 2010

Four short links: 21 October 2010

MySQL as NoSQL, Handmade SLR, Mac App Store, and Datamining Privacy Workshop

  1. Using MysQL as NoSQL750,000+ qps on a commodity MySQL/InnoDB 5.1 server from remote web clients.
  2. Making an SLR Camera from Scratch — amazing piece of hardware devotion. (via hackaday.com)
  3. Mac App Store Guidelines — Apple announce an app store for the Macintosh, similar to its app store for iPhones and iPads. “Mac App” no longer means generic “program”, it has a new and specific meaning, a program that must be installed through the App store and which has limited functionality (only one can run at a time, it’s full-screen, etc.). The list of guidelines for what kinds of programs you can’t sell through the App Store is interesting. Many have good reasons to be, but It creates a store inside itself for selling or distributing other software (i.e., an audio plug-in store in an audio app) is pure greed. Some are afeared that the next step is to make the App store the only way to install apps on a Mac, a move that would drive me away. It would be a sad day for Mac-lovers if Microsoft were to be the more open solution than Apple. cf the Owner’s Manifesto.
  4. Privacy Aspects of Data Mining — CFP for an IEEE workshop in December. (via jschneider on Twitter)
Comments: 4
Popular iPhone games stay highly-ranked only for a few weeks

Popular iPhone games stay highly-ranked only for a few weeks

With 40,000+ Games to choose from, the list of Top 100 free and paid games are frequently scanned by iPhone gamers. In this short post, I'll share some basic statistics on popular games sold through the U.S. iTunes app store.

Comments: 3