"augmented reality" entries

Softly buzzing phones could yield better augmented reality

Foursquare's Dennis Crowley on subtle forms of augmented reality.

Dennis Crowley, co-founder of Foursquare, says subtle interactions — like a buzzing phone — could lead to better augmented reality experiences than those provided through cameras and screens.

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Four short links: 3 May 2011

Four short links: 3 May 2011

Sentiment Analysis, Word Frequency, Design Process, and Plant Recognition

  1. SentiWordNet — WordNet with hints as to sentiment of particular terms, for use in sentiment analysis. (via Matt Biddulph)
  2. Word Frequency Lists and Dictionaries — also for text analysis. This site contains what we believe is the most accurate frequency data of English. It contains word frequency lists of the top 60,000 words (lemmas) in English, collocates lists (looking at nearby words to see word meaning and use), and n-grams (the frequency of all two and three-word sequences in the corpora).
  3. Crash Course in Web Design for StartupsWhen I was a wee pixel pusher I would overuse whatever graphic effect I had just learned. Text-shadow? Awesome, let’s put 5px 5px 5px #444. Border-radius? Knock that up to 15px. Gradients? How about from red to black? You can imagine how horrible everything looked. Now my rule of thumb in most cases is applying just enough to make it perceivable, no more. This usually means no blur on text-shadow and just a 1px offset, or only dealing with gradients moving between a very narrow color range. Almost everything in life is improved with this rule.
  4. LeafsnapColumbia University, the University of Maryland and the Smithsonian Institution have pooled their expertise to create the world’s first plant identification mobile app using visual search—Leafsnap. This electronic field guide allows users to identify tree species simply by taking a photograph of the tree’s leaves. In addition to the species name, Leafsnap provides high-resolution photographs and information about the tree’s flowers, fruit, seeds and bark—giving the user a comprehensive understanding of the species. iPhone for now, Android and iPad to come. (via Fiona Romeo)
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Four short links: 4 March 2011

Four short links: 4 March 2011

Javascript AR, Android Patterns, Node.js Book, and SMS Platforms

  1. JSARToolKit — Javascript port of the Flash AR Toolkit. I’m intrigued because the iPad2 has rear-facing camera and gyroscopes up the wazoo, and (of course) no Flash. (via Mike Shaver on Twitter)
  2. Android Patterns — set of design patterns for Android apps. (via Josh Clark on Twitter)
  3. Preview of Up and Running with Node.js (O’Reilly) — Tom Hughes-Croucher’s new book in preview form. Just sorting out commenting now. (via Tom on Twitter)
  4. #Blue Opens for Business — a web app that gets your text messages. You can reply, and there’s an API to give other apps read/write access. Signs the text message is finally becoming a consumer platform.
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Four short links: 23 December 2010

Four short links: 23 December 2010

Illusion of Government, Sterling on Wikileaks, Useful AR, and Real World Programming

  1. There Is No Such Thing as the Government — absolutely spot on there is no spoon moment for government. And that matters. It matters because once you recognise that fact, you can start to do things differently. People do, of course, recognise it at the level of caricature I have described here and nobody will admit to believing that they can get things done simply by pulling the levers of power. But inactions speak louder than words and the myth of the lever is harder to eradicate than any of us like to admit.
  2. The Blast Shack (Webstock) — Bruce Sterling on Wikileaks. No hacker story is more common than this. The ingenuity poured into the machinery is meaningless. The personal connections are treacherous. Welcome to the real world. No army can permit this kind of behavior and remain a functional army; so Manning is in solitary confinement and he is going to be court-martialled. With more political awareness, he might have made himself a public martyr to his conscience; but he lacks political awareness. He only has only his black-hat hacker awareness, which is all about committing awesome voyeuristic acts of computer intrusion and imagining you can get away with that when it really matters to people.
  3. Word Lens — finally, useful AR: it replaces foreign language text with translations.
  4. Staging Servers, Source Control, Deploy Workflows, and Other Stuff Nobody Teaches You — this guy has a point: when you emerge from programming school, you’re unlikely to have touched this kind of real-world programming.
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Strata Gems: DIY personal sensing and automation

A simple app turns Android phones into intelligent agents.

Tomorrow's augmented reality is being built today on mobile devices. The Tasker app for Android puts the power of the phone's sensors and network into the hands of non-programmers.

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Video pick: A real-time translating app

Word Lens translates Spanish text to English and vice versa.

It looks like the future of augmented reality has already arrived. Word Lens is an iPhone app that uses the built-in camera to translate Spanish text to English and vice versa. See it in action.

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Strata Gems: Kinect democratizes augmented reality

Tomorrow's reality will be prototyped on phones and gaming consoles

Developers can now hack up augmented reality solutions with commonplace gaming consoles, accelerating innovation in virtual extensions to our daily lives.

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"Then and now" with an augmented reality twist

National Archives' AR contest puts old photos in a modern setting.

The National Archives is running one of the coolest competitions ever to originate in the nation's capital: an augmented reality photo contest.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 17 November 2010

Four short links: 17 November 2010

Data Metrics, AR Intervention, Facebook Export, and Android ROMs

  1. Understanding Your Customers — I enjoyed Keith’s take on meaningful metrics. We talk a lot about being data-driven, but we interpret data with a model. The different take on meaningful metrics reflect the different underlying models that are lit up by data. It’s an important idea for the Strata conference, that gathering and processing data happens in the context of a world view, a data cosmology. (via Eric Ries)
  2. Bushwick AR Intervention 2010an augmented reality take over of Bushwick, Brooklyn NY. Artists will rework physical space with computer generated 3d graphics. A wide variety of works ranging from a virtual drug which has broken free of its internet constraints and is now effecting people in the real world, to a unicorn park, to serious commentary on the state of United States veterans will be free for the public to view [with correct mobile device]. (via Laurel Ruma)
  3. How to Mass Export all of your Facebook Friends’ Private Email Addresses (TechCrunch) — Arrington gives a big finger to Facebook’s “no, you can’t export your friends’ email addresses” policy by using the tools they provide to do just that. Not only is this useful, it also points out the hypocrisy of the company.
  4. TaintDroid — an Android ROM that tracks what apps do with your sensitive information. (via Brady Forrest on Twitter)
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Four short links: 15 October 2010

Four short links: 15 October 2010

Long Tail, Copyright vs Preservation, Diminished Reality, and Augmented Data

  1. Mechanical Turk Requester Activity: The Insignificance of the Long TailFor Wikipedia we have the 1% rule, where 1% of the contributors (this is 0.003% of the users) contribute two thirds of the content. In the Causes application on Facebook, there are 25 million users, but only 1% of them contribute a donation. […] The lognormal distribution of activity, also shows that requesters increase their participation exponentially over time: They post a few tasks, they get the results. If the results are good, they increase by a percentage the size of the tasks that they post next time. This multiplicative behavior is the basic process that generates the lognormal distribution of activity.
  2. Copyright Destroying Historic Audio — so says the Library of Congress. Were copyright law followed to the letter, little audio preservation would be undertaken. Were the law strictly enforced, it would brand virtually all audio preservation as illegal. Copyright laws related to preservation are neither strictly followed nor strictly enforced. Consequently, some audio preservation is conducted.
  3. Diminished Reality (Ray Kurzweil) — removes objects from video in real time. Great name, “diminished reality”. (via Andy Baio)
  4. Data Enrichment Service — using linked government data to augment text with annotations and links. (via Jo Walsh on Twitter)
Comments: 2