"augmented reality" entries

Strata Gems: Kinect democratizes augmented reality

Tomorrow's reality will be prototyped on phones and gaming consoles

Developers can now hack up augmented reality solutions with commonplace gaming consoles, accelerating innovation in virtual extensions to our daily lives.

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"Then and now" with an augmented reality twist

"Then and now" with an augmented reality twist

National Archives' AR contest puts old photos in a modern setting.

The National Archives is running one of the coolest competitions ever to originate in the nation's capital: an augmented reality photo contest.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 17 November 2010

Four short links: 17 November 2010

Data Metrics, AR Intervention, Facebook Export, and Android ROMs

  1. Understanding Your Customers — I enjoyed Keith’s take on meaningful metrics. We talk a lot about being data-driven, but we interpret data with a model. The different take on meaningful metrics reflect the different underlying models that are lit up by data. It’s an important idea for the Strata conference, that gathering and processing data happens in the context of a world view, a data cosmology. (via Eric Ries)
  2. Bushwick AR Intervention 2010an augmented reality take over of Bushwick, Brooklyn NY. Artists will rework physical space with computer generated 3d graphics. A wide variety of works ranging from a virtual drug which has broken free of its internet constraints and is now effecting people in the real world, to a unicorn park, to serious commentary on the state of United States veterans will be free for the public to view [with correct mobile device]. (via Laurel Ruma)
  3. How to Mass Export all of your Facebook Friends’ Private Email Addresses (TechCrunch) — Arrington gives a big finger to Facebook’s “no, you can’t export your friends’ email addresses” policy by using the tools they provide to do just that. Not only is this useful, it also points out the hypocrisy of the company.
  4. TaintDroid — an Android ROM that tracks what apps do with your sensitive information. (via Brady Forrest on Twitter)
Comment: 1
Four short links: 15 October 2010

Four short links: 15 October 2010

Long Tail, Copyright vs Preservation, Diminished Reality, and Augmented Data

  1. Mechanical Turk Requester Activity: The Insignificance of the Long TailFor Wikipedia we have the 1% rule, where 1% of the contributors (this is 0.003% of the users) contribute two thirds of the content. In the Causes application on Facebook, there are 25 million users, but only 1% of them contribute a donation. [...] The lognormal distribution of activity, also shows that requesters increase their participation exponentially over time: They post a few tasks, they get the results. If the results are good, they increase by a percentage the size of the tasks that they post next time. This multiplicative behavior is the basic process that generates the lognormal distribution of activity.
  2. Copyright Destroying Historic Audio — so says the Library of Congress. Were copyright law followed to the letter, little audio preservation would be undertaken. Were the law strictly enforced, it would brand virtually all audio preservation as illegal. Copyright laws related to preservation are neither strictly followed nor strictly enforced. Consequently, some audio preservation is conducted.
  3. Diminished Reality (Ray Kurzweil) — removes objects from video in real time. Great name, “diminished reality”. (via Andy Baio)
  4. Data Enrichment Service — using linked government data to augment text with annotations and links. (via Jo Walsh on Twitter)
Comments: 2
How augmented reality apps can catch on

How augmented reality apps can catch on

For mobile AR to gain mass appeal, it needs a platform or an engine.

A recent interview with Lynne d Johnson at Web 2.0 Expo NY got me thinking about how augmented reality apps can gain widespread adoption with companies and consumers. Here's two ideas.

Comments: 9

Bookish Techy Week in Review

Contrarian views on ereading's merits, Google Editions still MIA, and new interactive apps from Lonely Planet and Gourmet.

This week we noticed: the Chronicle of Higher Ed worrying about ereading's effects on youth, while a Harris poll suggested ereaders read more; fall showed up but Google Editions did not; the ECPA doesn't do a lot to protect privacy in the cloud; certain libraries are lending things they probably shouldn't be; and TOC Frankfurt is just around the corner.

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Reality has a gaming layer

Reality has a gaming layer

Kevin Slavin sees a world where games shape life and life shapes games.

Kevin Slavin, managing director of Area/Code and a speaker at Web 2.0 Expo New York, has worked at the the intersection of games and reality for nearly a decade. In this interview, Slavin explores the impact of mobile apps and the unexpected ways games shape our lives.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 16 August 2010

Four short links: 16 August 2010

Augmented Games, Matt Jones, Nuclear Data, Historical Tweetage

  1. Tips on Buying DesignWe don’t work on projects that aren’t essential to the client’s business. The further a project gets from a client’s core concerns the more likely it will be run on subjectivity and whims, or be starved of the internal attention and resources it needs to succeed. The same applies to hiring a design team. Work with someone who’s excited to be working with you. You’ll get better work. (via moleitau on Twitter)
  2. Is the Sky Falling on the Content Industries? — research paper covering the history of “X will kill Y” from the content industries. Switching channels to the video industry, by the late 1950’s and the 1960’s, the television industry was threatened by another bogeyman that was going to destroy television. The existing business model was providing television for free; the threat was cable television. Note the irony here. The argument was not that paid content can’t compete with free, the argument is free content can’t compete with paid. If we don’t shut down the cable television industry, no one will bother to produce new television shows, and there won’t be anything to go on cable. This is an argument that made it all the way to the United States Supreme Court in the Fortnightly case and led to a decision that brought us within two votes of shutting down the cable television industry. (via lawgeeknz on Twitter)
Comment: 1
Augmented reality as etiquette coach

Augmented reality as etiquette coach

Alasdair Allan has a practical goal for AR: putting names to faces.

Alasdair Allen, author of Programming iPhone Sensors, says real-time facial identification — the sort that pairs names and faces on the fly — is closer than you might think. He expands on that topic and a number of others in this video interview.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 4 March 2010 Four short links: 4 March 2010

Four short links: 4 March 2010

Achievement Design, Estimation, DRM Usability, and Ubicomp v AR

  1. Achievement Design 101 — advice from the guy who designs the site-wide achievement awards for Kongregate. 7. Achievements will thrust their subject matter into the spotlight; make sure it’s worthy. This can be good or bad. In most cases on Kongregate, adding achievements to games will cause the user rating to drop. There are many theories about why this is — my best guess is that there’s a difference in psychology between people who play a game just to have fun (how weird!) and people who play a game to earn achievements. For the latter category, the whole game can be viewed as merely an obstacle. (via diveintomark)
  2. Fundamental Constants and the Problem of Gravity — huge variation uncertainty in different fundamental constants: we know one to 1 part in 100 million, but another to only 1 in 10 thousand. Led me to wonder whether anyone’s done project estimation with error bars, analysing past projects to figure out the error rates in estimates of programmer time, etc.
  3. How to Download an eBook From The Cleveland Public Library — aka “Why DRM Doesn’t Work”. The usability of this 22-step process is appalling. (via BoingBoing)
  4. Defining Ubiquitous Computing vs Augmented Reality — not arbitrary terms but there are some interesting concepts that ubicomp has which don’t seem to be coming out in the current AR fad. (via bruces on Twitter)
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