"augmented reality" entries

How augmented reality apps can catch on

For mobile AR to gain mass appeal, it needs a platform or an engine.

A recent interview with Lynne d Johnson at Web 2.0 Expo NY got me thinking about how augmented reality apps can gain widespread adoption with companies and consumers. Here's two ideas.

Comments: 9

Bookish Techy Week in Review

Contrarian views on ereading's merits, Google Editions still MIA, and new interactive apps from Lonely Planet and Gourmet.

This week we noticed: the Chronicle of Higher Ed worrying about ereading's effects on youth, while a Harris poll suggested ereaders read more; fall showed up but Google Editions did not; the ECPA doesn't do a lot to protect privacy in the cloud; certain libraries are lending things they probably shouldn't be; and TOC Frankfurt is just around the corner.

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Reality has a gaming layer

Kevin Slavin sees a world where games shape life and life shapes games.

Kevin Slavin, managing director of Area/Code and a speaker at Web 2.0 Expo New York, has worked at the the intersection of games and reality for nearly a decade. In this interview, Slavin explores the impact of mobile apps and the unexpected ways games shape our lives.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 16 August 2010

Four short links: 16 August 2010

Augmented Games, Matt Jones, Nuclear Data, Historical Tweetage

  1. Tips on Buying DesignWe don’t work on projects that aren’t essential to the client’s business. The further a project gets from a client’s core concerns the more likely it will be run on subjectivity and whims, or be starved of the internal attention and resources it needs to succeed. The same applies to hiring a design team. Work with someone who’s excited to be working with you. You’ll get better work. (via moleitau on Twitter)
  2. Is the Sky Falling on the Content Industries? — research paper covering the history of “X will kill Y” from the content industries. Switching channels to the video industry, by the late 1950’s and the 1960’s, the television industry was threatened by another bogeyman that was going to destroy television. The existing business model was providing television for free; the threat was cable television. Note the irony here. The argument was not that paid content can’t compete with free, the argument is free content can’t compete with paid. If we don’t shut down the cable television industry, no one will bother to produce new television shows, and there won’t be anything to go on cable. This is an argument that made it all the way to the United States Supreme Court in the Fortnightly case and led to a decision that brought us within two votes of shutting down the cable television industry. (via lawgeeknz on Twitter)
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Augmented reality as etiquette coach

Alasdair Allan has a practical goal for AR: putting names to faces.

Alasdair Allen, author of Programming iPhone Sensors, says real-time facial identification — the sort that pairs names and faces on the fly — is closer than you might think. He expands on that topic and a number of others in this video interview.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 4 March 2010

Four short links: 4 March 2010

Achievement Design, Estimation, DRM Usability, and Ubicomp v AR

  1. Achievement Design 101 — advice from the guy who designs the site-wide achievement awards for Kongregate. 7. Achievements will thrust their subject matter into the spotlight; make sure it’s worthy. This can be good or bad. In most cases on Kongregate, adding achievements to games will cause the user rating to drop. There are many theories about why this is — my best guess is that there’s a difference in psychology between people who play a game just to have fun (how weird!) and people who play a game to earn achievements. For the latter category, the whole game can be viewed as merely an obstacle. (via diveintomark)
  2. Fundamental Constants and the Problem of Gravity — huge variation uncertainty in different fundamental constants: we know one to 1 part in 100 million, but another to only 1 in 10 thousand. Led me to wonder whether anyone’s done project estimation with error bars, analysing past projects to figure out the error rates in estimates of programmer time, etc.
  3. How to Download an eBook From The Cleveland Public Library — aka “Why DRM Doesn’t Work”. The usability of this 22-step process is appalling. (via BoingBoing)
  4. Defining Ubiquitous Computing vs Augmented Reality — not arbitrary terms but there are some interesting concepts that ubicomp has which don’t seem to be coming out in the current AR fad. (via bruces on Twitter)
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Augmented reality and the ultimate user manual

The ARMAR project shows how augmented reality can revolutionize learning

The ARMAR augmented reality project out of Columbia University offers an intriguing glimpse into how AR and education may soon intersect. Instead of rifling through a manual or looking up information, an AR layer could guide you through a task. The creators of ARMAR talk about their work and its implications in this Q&A.

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A Dream About Augmented Reality Fiction

Last night I dreamed that one of my authors (no name or face that I can recall – one of the phantasms created by the half-waking imagination) had sold me rights to a novel he'd written, and was eager for me to publish it as an ebook. It turned out that the "ebook" we were developing was actually a movie…

Comments: 22
Four short links: 27 November 2009

Four short links: 27 November 2009

3D Models from Webcams, a Javascript Scheme, EMACS in Your Browser, and CS History

  1. ProFORMA — software which builds a 3D model as you rotate an object in front of your webcam. Check out the video below. (via Wired)
  2. BiwaScheme — a Scheme interpreter written in Javascript. (via Hacker News)
  3. YMacs — in-browser EMACS written in Javascript. Emacs, for those of you who were left in any doubt, is the only editor ever created by software engineers worth a damn (where “worth a damn” == “has possibly already achieved sentience”) with the possible exception of teco.
  4. Historic Documents in Computer Science — my eye was caught by John Backus’s first FORTRAN manual, Niklaus Wirth’s original Pascal paper, the BCPL reference manual (the C programming language got its name from the C in BCPL), and Eckert and Mauchly’s ENIAC patent. (via Hacker News)

Comments: 2

The iPhone: Tricorder Version 1.0?

The iPhone, in addition to revolutionizing how people thought about mobile phone user interfaces, also was one of the first devices to offer a suite of sensors measuring everything from the visual environment to position to acceleration, all in a package that could fit in your shirt pocket. On December 3rd, O’Reilly will be offering a one-day online edition of the Where 2.0 conference, focusing on the iPhone sensors, and what you can do with them.

Comments: 6