ENTRIES TAGGED "big data analytics"

Databricks aims to build next-generation analytic tools for Big Data

A new startup will accelerate the maturation of the Berkeley Data Analytics Stack

Key technologists behind the Berkeley Data Analytics Stack (BDAS) have launched a company that will build software – centered around Apache Spark and Shark – for analyzing big data. Details of their product and strategy are sparse, as the company is operating in stealth mode. But through conversations with the founders of Databricks, I’ve learned that they’ll be building general purpose analytic tools that can leverage HDFS, YARN, as well as other components of BDAS.

It will be interesting to see how the team transitions to the corporate world. Their Series A funding round of $14M is being led by Andreessen Horowitz. The board will be composed of Ben Horowitz, Scott Shenker, Matei Zaharia, and Ion Stoica.

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Big Data and Advertising: In the trenches

Volume, variety, velocity, and a rare peek inside sponsored search advertising at Google

The $35B merger of Omnicom and Publicis put the convergence of Big Data and Advertising1 in the front pages of business publications. Adtech2 companies have long been at the forefront of many data technologies, strategies, and techniques. By now it’s well-known that many impressive large scale, realtime analytics systems in production, support3 advertising. A lot of effort has gone towards accurately predicting and measuring click-through rates, so at least for online advertising, data scientists and data engineers have gone a long way towards addressing4 the famous “but we don’t know which half” line.

The industry has its share of problems: privacy & creepiness come to mind, and like other technology sectors adtech has its share of “interesting” patent filings (see for example here, here, here). With so many companies dependent on online advertising, some have lamented the industry’s hold5 on data scientists. But online advertising does offer data scientists and data engineers lots of interesting technical problems to work on, many of which involve the deployment (and creation) of open source tools for massive amounts of data.

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How signals, geometry, and topology are influencing data science

Areas concerned with shapes, invariants, and dynamics, in high-dimensions, are proving useful in data analysis

I’ve been noticing unlikely areas of mathematics pop-up in data analysis. While signal processing is a natural fit, topology, differential and algebraic geometry aren’t exactly areas you associate with data science. But upon further reflection perhaps it shouldn’t be so surprising that areas that deal in shapes, invariants, and dynamics, in high-dimensions, would have something to contribute to the analysis of large data sets. Without further ado, here are a few examples that stood out for me. (If you know of other examples of recent applications of math in data analysis, please share them in the comments.)

Compressed Sensing
Compressed sensing is a signal processing technique which makes efficient data collection possible. As an example using compressed sensing images can be reconstructed from small amounts of data. Idealized Sampling is used to collect information to measure the most important components. By vastly decreasing the number of measurements to be collected, less data needs to stored, and one reduces the amount of time and energy1 needed to collect signals. Already there have been applications in medical imaging and mobile phones.

The problem is you don’t know ahead of time which signals/components are important. A series of numerical experiments led Emanuel Candes to believe that random samples may be the answer. The theoretical foundation as to why a random set of signals would work, where laid down in a series of papers by Candes and Fields Medalist Terence Tao2.

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Scalable streaming analytics using a single-server

The simplest and quickest way to mine your data is to deploy efficient algorithms designed to answer key questions at scale.

For many organizations real-time1 analytics entails complex event processing systems (CEP) or newer distributed stream processing frameworks like Storm, S4, or Spark Streaming. The latter have become more popular because they are able to process massive amounts of data, and fit nicely with Hadoop and other cluster computing tools. For these distributed frameworks peak volume is function of network topology/bandwidth and the throughput of the individual nodes.

Scaling up machine-learning: Find efficient algorithms
Faced with having to crunch through a massive data set, the first thing a machine-learning expert will try to do is devise a more efficient algorithm. Some popular approaches involve sampling, online learning, and caching. Parallelizing an algorithm tends to be lower on the list of things to try. The key reason is that while there are algorithms that are embarrassingly parallel (e.g., naive bayes), many others are harder to decouple. But as I highlighted in a recent post, efficient tools that run on single servers can tackle large data sets. In the machine-learning context recent examples2 of efficient algorithms that scale to large data sets, can be found in the products of startup SkyTree.

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Single server systems can tackle big data

Business Intelligence, machine-learning, and graph processing systems tackle large data sets with single servers.

About a year ago a blog post from SAP posited1 that when it comes to analytics, most companies are in the multi-terabyte range: data sizes that are well-within the scope of distributed in-memory solutions like Spark, SAP HANA, ScaleOut Software, GridGain, and Terracotta.

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Big data in the cloud

How do the cloud offerings from Amazon, Google and Microsoft compare?

Big data and cloud technology go hand-in-hand: but it's comparatively early days. Strata conference chair Edd Dumbill explains the cloud landscape and compares the offerings of Amazon, Google and Microsoft.

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Where is the OkCupid for elections?

Where is the OkCupid for elections?

Developers are using big data to match people with candidates.

What will be the "OkCupid for elections" in 2012? Open source app OkCandidate.com offers one approach and startup ElectNext is applying data analysis with an issue-matching engine.

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Publishing News: Agency pricing, out of the pan and into the fire

Publishing News: Agency pricing, out of the pan and into the fire

Publishers face antitrust investigations, newspapers must control their ads and data, and a look at the most-read web authors.

Antitrust investigations into agency pricing were opened by the EU and the US. Elsewhere, David Soloff at AdAge offered much-needed advice for newspaper/magazine revenue, and Read it Later used its data to identify the web's top authors.

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