ENTRIES TAGGED "bookmarking"

Four short links: 31 December 2010

Four short links: 31 December 2010

Statistics, Tech Writing, Shared Spaces, and Delicious Exodus

  1. The Joy of Stats — Hans Rosling’s BBC documentary on statistics, available to watch online.
  2. Best Tech Writing of 2010 — I need a mass “add these to Instapaper” button. (via Hacker News)
  3. Google Shared Spaces: Why We Made It (Pamela Fox) — came out of what people were trying to do with Google Wave.
  4. The Great Delicious Exodus — traffic graph as experienced by pinboard.
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Four short links: 28 December 2010

Four short links: 28 December 2010

Amazon Records, Social Bookmarking, Female Founders, and CSS Framework

  1. Amazon Sold 158 Items/Second on Cyber Monday (TechCrunch) — I remember when 20 hits/s on a Sun web server was considered pretty friggin’ amazing. Just pause a moment and ponder the infrastructure Amazon has marshaled to be able to do this: data centers, replication, load balancers, payment processing, fulfillment, elastic cloud computing, storage servers, cheap power, bandwidth beyond comprehension.
  2. Quick Thoughts on Pinboard (Matt Haughey) — thoughtful comments, and an immediate and just as thoughtful response. (I am a happy pinboard user who is also looking forward to the social networking features to come)
  3. Female Founders — impressively long list of female startup founders. (via Hacker News)
  4. Less Framework cross-device css grid system based on using inline media queries. (via Pinboard)
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Four short links: 15 June 2010

Four short links: 15 June 2010

Bookmarking, Open Notebook Science, Starbucks, and Documentation

  1. On Bookmarking: Dogears and Marginalia — asking the question “how do you bookmark in real life?”. I’m interested because I have recently begun obsessively collecting the good quotes and references from books I read, thanks to Amazon Kindle app’s highlights. (via titine on Delicious)
  2. Systems for Open Electronic Lab Notebooks — question from a very respected scientist (Jonathan Eisen, king of the phylogenetic tree and “phylogenomics” on Twitter) about tools and software for open lab notebooks. Turns out it’s by no means a solved problem, so a good hacker working with such a lab could do some good things for science.
  3. Starbucks, Wifi, Paid Content (ReadWriteWeb) — Starbucks announced free wifi, from which customers can access content they’d otherwise have to pay for (e.g., WSJ). Interesting to me for several reasons: libraries also offer access to information you’d otherwise not have access to; and Starbucks are turning the physical store into a virtual one as well.
  4. Writing Great Documentation (Jacob Kaplan-Moss) — it’s all true, read it and write.
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