ENTRIES TAGGED "business"

Four short links: 7 May 2014

Four short links: 7 May 2014

Internet Broadband, Open Radio, Excel Formulae in JS, and Block Chains

  1. Observations of an Internet MiddlemanFive of those congested peers are in the United States and one is in Europe. There are none in any other part of the world. All six are large Broadband consumer networks with a dominant or exclusive market share in their local market. In countries or markets where consumers have multiple Broadband choices (like the UK) there are no congested peers. Relevant as competition works for gigabit fibre to consumers.
  2. Open TXopen source firmware for RC radio transmitters. The firmware is highly configurable and brings much more features than found in traditional radios.
  3. formula.js — Excel formulae in Javascript. Waiting for someone to write a Apple 1 emulator in them.
  4. Minimum Viable Block ChainThe block chain is agnostic to any “currency”. In fact, it can (and will) be adapted to power many other use cases. As a result, it pays to understand the how and the why behind the “minimum viable block chain”.
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Four short links: 5 May 2014

Four short links: 5 May 2014

After Search, Instrumenting Pompeii, Replaceable Work, and The Coding Adventure

  1. This is What Comes After Search (Quartz) — it’s “context”, aka knowing what you’re doing and thinking to the point where the device can tell you what you need to know before you search for it. Also known as the apotheosis of passive consumption.
  2. Wiretapping the Ruins of Pompeii — Pompeii on its way to being one of the most instrumented cities in the world, a mere two thousand years since it was last inhabited. (via Pete Warden)
  3. Technology is Taking Over English Departmentsbanausic—the kind of labor that can be outsourced to non-specialists. (via Courtney Johnston)
  4. phabricatorOpen software engineering platform and fun adventure game. TAKE AWESOME.
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Four short links: 1 May 2014

Four short links: 1 May 2014

Cloud Jurisdiction, Driverless Cars, Robotics IPOs, and Fitting a Catalytic Convertor to Your Data Exhaust

  1. US Providers Must Divulge from Offshore Servers (Gigaom) — A U.S. magistrate judge ruled that U.S. cloud vendors must fork over customer data even if that data resides in data centers outside the country. (via Alistair Croll)
  2. Inside Google’s Self-Driving Car (Atlantic Cities) — Urmson says the value of maps is one of the key insights that emerged from the DARPA challenges. They give the car a baseline expectation of its environment; they’re the difference between the car opening its eyes in a completely new place and having some prior idea what’s going on around it. This is a long and interesting piece on the experience and the creator’s concerns around the self-driving cars. Still looking for the comprehensive piece on the subject.
  3. Recent Robotics-Relate IPOs — not all the exits are to Google.
  4. How One Woman Hid Her Pregnancy From Big Data (Mashable) — “I really couldn’t have done it without Tor, because Tor was really the only way to manage totally untraceable browsing. I know it’s gotten a bad reputation for Bitcoin trading and buying drugs online, but I used it for BabyCenter.com.”
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Four short links: 18 April 2014

Four short links: 18 April 2014

Interview Tips, Data of Any Size, Science Writing, and Instrumented Javascript

  1. 16 Interviewing Tips for User Studies — these apply to many situations beyond user interviews, too.
  2. The Backlash Against Big Data contd. (Mike Loukides) — Learn to be a data skeptic. That doesn’t mean becoming skeptical about the value of data; it means asking the hard questions that anyone claiming to be a data scientist should ask. Think carefully about the questions you’re asking, the data you have to work with, and the results that you’re getting. And learn that data is about enabling intelligent discussions, not about turning a crank and having the right answer pop out.
  3. The Science of Science Writing (American Scientist) — also applicable beyond the specific field for which it was written.
  4. earhornEarhorn instruments your JavaScript and shows you a detailed, reversible, line-by-line log of JavaScript execution, sort of like console.log’s crazy uncle.
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Four short links: 10 April 2014

Four short links: 10 April 2014

Rise of the Patent Troll, Farm Data, The Block Chain, and Better Writing

  1. Rise of the Patent Troll: Everything is a Remix (YouTube) — primer on patent trolls, in language anyone can follow. Part of the fixpatents.org campaign. (via BoingBoing)
  2. Petabytes of Field Data (GigaOm) — Farm Intelligence using sensors and computer vision to generate data for better farm decision making.
  3. Bullish on Blockchain (Fred Wilson) — our 2014 fund will be built during the blockchain cycle. “The blockchain” is bitcoin’s distributed consensus system, interesting because it’s the return of p2p from the Chasm of Ridicule or whatever the Gartner Trite Cycle calls the time between first investment bubble and second investment bubble under another name.
  4. Hemingway — online writing tool to help you make your writing clear and direct. (via Nina Simon)
Comments: 2

Business models that make the Internet of Things feasible

The bid for widespread home use may drive technical improvements.

For some people, it’s too early to plan mass consumerization of the Internet of Things. Developers are contentedly tinkering with Arduinos and clip cables, demonstrating cool one-off applications. We know that home automation can save energy, keep the elderly and disabled independent, and make life better for a lot of people. But no one seems sure how to realize this goal, outside of security systems and a few high-end items for luxury markets (like the Nest devices, now being integrated into Google’s grand plan).

But what if the willful creation of a mass consumer market could make the technology even better? Perhaps the Internet of Things needs a consumer focus to achieve its potential. This view was illuminated for me through a couple recent talks with Mike Harris, CEO of the home automation software platform Zonoff.

Read more…

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Four short links: 28 March 2014

Four short links: 28 March 2014

Javascript on Glass, Smart Lights, Hardware Startups, MySQL at Scale

  1. WearScript — open source project putting Javascript on Glass. See story on it. (via Slashdot)
  2. Mining the World’s Data by Selling Street Lights and Farm Drones (Quartz) — Depending on what kinds of sensors the light’s owners choose to install, Sensity’s fixtures can track everything from how much power the lights themselves are consuming to movement under the post, ambient light, and temperature. More sophisticated sensors can measure pollution levels, radiation, and particulate matter (for air quality levels). The fixtures can also support sound or video recording. Bring these lights onto city streets and you could isolate the precise location of a gunshot within seconds.
  3. An Investor’s Guide to Hardware Startups — good to know if you’re thinking of joining one, too.
  4. WebScaleSQL — a MySQL downstream patchset built for “large scale” (aka Google, Facebook type loads).
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Four short links: 21 March 2014

Four short links: 21 March 2014

PHP++, Planning, BitCoin, and Concurrency

  1. Hack — PHP with types, generics, collections, lambdas. From Facebook.
  2. Solve Hard Things EarlyBuild great habits around communication and decision-making when everyone still knows each other well.
  3. Marginally Useful (Paul Ford) — The last two decades have suggested a post-scarcity economy, where infinite copies of attractive digital things have a price approaching $0. Maybe that was merely a passing moment that we will look back upon with wonder once limited coins enforce scarcity—once the owner of a piece of digital art can look upon it with satisfaction and know with total, cryptographic certainty that because he paid for it, it belongs to him and no one else.
  4. Go Pipelines and Cancellation — Go’s fascinating me, as an example of a language designed for concurrency and syntactic familiarity.
Comment: 1
Four short links: 18 March 2014

Four short links: 18 March 2014

On Managers, Human Data, Driverless Cars, and Bad Business

  1. On Managers (Mike Migurski) — Managers might be difficult, hostile, or useless, but because they are parts of an explicit power structure they can be evaluated explicitly.
  2. Big Data: Humans Required (Sherri Hammons) — the heart of the problem with data: interpretation. Data by itself is of little value. It is only when it is interpreted and understood that it begins to become information. GovTech recently wrote an article outlining why search engines will not likely replace actual people in the near future. If it were merely a question of pointing technology at the problem, we could all go home and wait for the Answer to Everything. But, data doesn’t happen that way. Data is very much like a computer: it will do just as it’s told. No more, no less. A human is required to really understand what data makes sense and what doesn’t. (via Anne Zelenka)
  3. Morgan Stanley on the Economic Benefits of Driverless CarsThe total savings of over $5.6 trillion annually are not envisioned until a couple of decades as Morgan Stanley see four phases of adoption of self-driving vehicles. Phase 1 is already underway, Phase 2 will be semi-autonomous, Phase 3 will be within 5 to 10 years, by which time we will see fully self-driving vehicles on the roads – but not widespread usage. The authors say Phase 4, which will have the biggest impact, is when 100% of all vehicles on the roads will be fully autonomous, they say this may take a couple of decades.
  4. Worse (Marco Arment) — I’ve been sitting on this but can’t fault it. In the last few years, Google, Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Twitter have all made huge attempts to move into major parts of each others’ businesses, usually at the detriment of their customers or users.
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Four short links: 17 March 2014

Four short links: 17 March 2014

Wireframe Quiz, Business Values, Mobile Dev, and the Bad Guy Mindset

  1. De-Design the Web — quiz, can you recognise common websites from just their wireframes? For the non-designer (like myself) it’s a potent reminder of the power of design. Design’s front of mind as we chew on the Internet of Affordances. (via USvsTHEM)
  2. Words I Hold Dear (Slideshare) — short but effective presentation on values in business. If you are confident that you can bear responsibility, and will not do anything immoral, illegal, or unethical, then it is not too hard to choose the path that promises the most adventure.
  3. Android Development for iOS Devs — in case you had forgotten that developing for multiple mobile platforms is like a case of fire-breathing butt warts. (not good)
  4. The World Through the Eyes of Hackers (PDF) — I’ve long thought that the real problem is that schools trains subordinates to meet expectations and think like a Nice Person, but defence is only possible when you know how to break expectations and think like a Bad Guy.
Comment: 1