ENTRIES TAGGED "c"

Four short links: 4 April 2014

Four short links: 4 April 2014

MSFT Opening, Declarative Web, Internet Utility, and Design Fiction Reading List

  1. C# Compiler Open Sourced — bit by the bit, the ship of Microsoft turns.
  2. The Web’s Declarative Composable Future — this. For the first time since 1993, I feel like the web platform is taking a step towards being a real platform (vs simply bolting features on the side).
  3. Why the Government Should Provide Internet Access — video interview with Susan Crawford about why the Internet should be treated like a utility. She’s the only policy person I see talking sense. There’s a multilarity coming, when a critical mass of everyday objects are connected to each other via the Internet and offline devices become as useful as an ox-drawn cart on railway tracks. At that point it’s too late to argue you need affordable predator-proof Internet, because you’re already over the (sensing, e-ink covered, Arduino-powered) barrel. (via BoingBoing)
  4. Design Fiction: A BibliographySome resources about design fiction I’m use to share with students.
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Four short links: 20 January 2014

Four short links: 20 January 2014

iOS Pentesting, Twitter's Infrastructure, JS Data Sync, and Chromium as C Runtime

  1. idb (Github) — a tool to simplify some common tasks for iOS pentesting and research: screenshots, logs, plists/databases/caches, app binary decryption/download, etc. (via ShmooCon)
  2. Twitter Infrastructure — an interview with Raffi Krikorian, VP of Platform Engineering. Details on SOA, deployment schedule, rollouts, and culture. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. Orbit (Github) — a standalone Javascript lib for data access and synchronization.
  4. Chromium is the New C Runtime — using Chrome’s open source core as the standard stack of networking, crash report, testing, logging, strings, encryption, concurrency, etc. libraries for C programming.
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New school C

Why C is a more practical and enticing programming language than you might think.

Choosing a programming language for that project you’re working on is a fairly straightforward decision: it needs to be fast, easy to use, and it must come with enough bells and whistles to keep you from re-inventing the wheel every time you want to do something. Looking at this criteria, aside from the fast bit, the C language may…
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Why we need Go

Rob Pike on how Go fits into today's computing environment

The Go programming language was created by Rob Pike, Ken Thompson, and Robert Griesemer. Pike (@rob_pike) recently told me that Go was born while they were waiting a long while for some code to compile — too long. C++ and Java have long…
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Four short links: 12 September 2012

Four short links: 12 September 2012

Time-Series Database, Multi-Device TV, C# to Javascript, and Tiny Research

  1. Seriesly — time-series database written in go.
  2. Tablets and TV (Luke Wroblewski) — In August 2012, 77% of TV viewers used another device at the same time in a typical day. 81% used a smartphone and TV at the same time. 66% used a laptop and TV at the same time.
  3. Saltarelle — open source (Apache2) C# to Javascript compiler. (via Javascript Weekly)
  4. Tiny Transactions on Computer Science — computer science research in 140 characters or fewer.
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Top Stories: June 25-29, 2012

Top Stories: June 25-29, 2012

William Gibson's apt predictions, why C matters, and a vote against lightweight DRM.

This week on O'Reilly: James Turner noted that the corporate dystopia predicted in "Neuromancer" has come to pass, author David Griffith discussed C's continued popularity, and Joe Wikert explained why lightweight ebook DRM isn't viable.

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Why learn C?

Why learn C?

David Griffiths on C's consistent popularity and what the language can do for you.

In this Code podcast, "Head First C" co-author David Griffith discusses C's continued popularity and why C and Arduino work well together.

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Developing cross-platform mobile apps with C#

Greg Shackles on using C# and .NET to build apps that work across mobile platforms.

Web developer and author Greg Shackles reveals the advantages of using C# over C++ for writing mobile apps. He also explains why Android and iOS developers should give C# a serious look.

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Cross-platform mobile development is a breeze with C#

Cross-platform mobile development is a breeze with C#

Greg Shackles on why C# makes sense for mobile development.

Find out why using C# for cross-platform mobile development will take you less time and less code while bringing your apps to a wider audience.

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Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump

Developer Week in Review: The hijacking of an insulin pump

Medical devices are remotely hacked, Google Maps get a price tag, and Linus Torvalds really doesn't like a certain language.

If you own an insulin pump, someone out there might have a hack with your name on it. Google decides to make high-volume Maps API users pony up some cash, and the creator of Linux goes after C++.

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