ENTRIES TAGGED "cloud computing"

What VMware's Cloud Foundry announcement is about

What VMware's Cloud Foundry announcement is about

Cloud Foundry is aggressively open middleware, offering a flexible way to administer applications.

By now, the popular APIs for IaaS have been satisfactorily emulated so that you can move your application fairly easily from one vendor to another. But until now, the PaaS situation was much more closed.

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What VMware’s Cloud Foundry announcement is about

What VMware’s Cloud Foundry announcement is about

Cloud Foundry is aggressively open middleware, offering a flexible way to administer applications.

By now, the popular APIs for IaaS have been satisfactorily emulated so that you can move your application fairly easily from one vendor to another. But until now, the PaaS situation was much more closed.

Comment: 1

Reaching the pinnacle: truly open web services and clouds

Part 5 of the series, "What are the chances for a free software cloud?"

The merger of free software with cloud and web services is a win-win. The transition will take a buy-in from cloud and SaaS providers, a change in the software development process, a stronger link between computational and data clouds, and new conventions to be learned by clients of the services. (Part 5 of a 5-part series.)

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Four short links: 21 December 2010

Four short links: 21 December 2010

Big Companyitis, Spyware Apps, Maturing Cloud, and Mobile Sync

  1. Cash Cow Disease — quite harsh on Google and Microsoft for “ingesting not investing” in promising startups, then disconnecting them from market signals. Like pixie dust, potential future advertising revenues can be sprinkled on any revenue-negative scheme to make it look brilliant. (via Dan Martell)
  2. Your Apps Are Watching You (Wall Street Journal) — the iPhone apps transmitted more data than the apps on phones using Google Inc.’s Android operating system [...] Both the Android and iPhone versions of Pandora, a popular music app, sent age, gender, location and phone identifiers to various ad networks. iPhone and Android versions of a game called Paper Toss—players try to throw paper wads into a trash can—each sent the phone’s ID number to at least five ad companies. Grindr, an iPhone app for meeting gay men, sent gender, location and phone ID to three ad companies. [...] Among all apps tested, the most widely shared detail was the unique ID number assigned to every phone. It is effectively a “supercookie,” [...] on iPhones, this number is the “UDID,” or Unique Device Identifier. Android IDs go by other names. These IDs are set by phone makers, carriers or makers of the operating system, and typically can’t be blocked or deleted. “The great thing about mobile is you can’t clear a UDID like you can a cookie,” says Meghan O’Holleran of Traffic Marketplace, an Internet ad network that is expanding into mobile apps. “That’s how we track everything.”
  3. On Undo’s Undue Importance (Paul Kedrosky) — The mainstream has money and risks, and so it cares immensely. It wants products and services where big failures aren’t catastrophic, and where small failures, the sorts of thing that “undo” fixes, can be rolled back. Undo matters, in other words, because its appearance almost always signals that a market has gone from fringe to mainstream, with profits set to follow. (via Tim O’Reilly on Twitter)
  4. libimobiledevice — open source library that talks the protocols to support iPhone®, iPod Touch®, iPad® and Apple TV® devices without jailbreaking or proprietary libraries.
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Why web services should be released as free software

Part 4 of the series, "What are the chances for a free software cloud?"

Let’s put together a pitch for cloud and web service providers. We have two hurdles to leap: one persuading them how they’ll benefit by releasing the source code to their software, and one addressing their fear of releasing the source code.

Comments: 6

Why clouds and web services will continue to take over computing

Part 3 of the series, "What are the chances for a free software cloud?"

My long-term view convinces me we all will be in the cloud. The advantages are just too compelling. But what can we do to preserve freedom in the cloud? (Part 3 of a 5-part series.)

Comments: 6

Defining clouds, web services, and other remote computing

Part 2 of the series, "What are the chances for a free software cloud?"

Technology commentators are a bit trapped by the term "cloud," which
has been kicked and slapped around enough to become truly shapeless.
So in this section I'll offer a history of services that have led up
to our cloud-obsessed era, hoping to help readers distinguish the
impacts and trade-offs created by all the trends that lie in the
"cloud."

Comments: 5

Resolving the contradictions between web services, clouds, and open source

Part 1 of the series, "What are the chances for a free software cloud?"

A "free software cloud" may seem to be an oxymoron. But I believe that free software and remote computing were made for each other; their future lies together and the sooner they converge, the faster they will evolve and gain adoption. (Part 1 of a 5-part series.)

Comments: 12
Four short links: 10 December 2010

Four short links: 10 December 2010

Javascript Snowmarklet, Tech Startups, Enterprise Dropbox, and Cloud Contracts

  1. Let it Snow — bookmarklet from David Flanagan that makes Javascript snowflakes fall. Awww. (via Mike Loukides)
  2. You Can Work on Great Technology at StartupsThere are more innovative database startups at various stages in their life than I can remember right now. So true–waiting for the inevitable amalgamation, thinning out, etc. (via Nat Friedman on Twitter)
  3. Dropbox for Teams — an interesting package of features from a very innovative company. (via Hacker News)
  4. Cloud Computing ChecklistComparison and Analysis of the Terms and Conditions of Cloud Computing Services. What to look out for when signing a cloud contract. (via Rick Shera in email)
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Cloud computing's fear factor: Acknowledge, reduce, move on

Cloud computing's fear factor: Acknowledge, reduce, move on

If cloud computing has so much potential, why are many organizations afraid of it?

A combination of negative messages and concerns about readiness have made cloud computing the most feared of the big technology innovations. There are legitimate reasons to approach the cloud with care, but we should not be consumed by irrational fear.

Comments: 7