ENTRIES TAGGED "crime"

Four short links: 29 March 2012

Four short links: 29 March 2012

Tricorder, Microsoft and Open Source, Crime is Freedom's Contra, and Government Cybercrime

  1. Tricorder Project — open sourced designs for a tricorder, released as part of the Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize. (via Slashdot)
  2. Microsoft’s New Open Sourced Stacks (Miguel de Icaza) — not just open sourced (some of the code had been under MS Permissive License before, now it’s Apache) but developed in public with git: ASP.NET MVC, ASP.NET Web API, ASP.NET Web Pages v2. The Azure SDK is also on github.
  3. In An Internet Age, Crime is Essential to Freedom (Donald Clark) — when a criminal asks: “How do I secure payment and store my ill-gotten gains”, somewhere else, a refugee asks: “How can I send funds back to a relative such that they can’t be traced to me”.
  4. NSA: China Behind RSA Attacks (Information Week) — I can argue both sides about whether government cloud services are a boon or a curse for remote information thieves. Looking forward to seeing how it plays out.
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Profile of the Data Journalist: The Homicide Watch

Chris Amico and Laura Norton Amico's project started as a spreadsheet. Now it's a community news platform.

To learn more about the people who are redefining the practice computer-assisted reporting, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, Radar conducted a series of email interviews with data journalists during the 2012 NICAR Conference. "It’s not just about the data, and it’s not just about the journalism, but it’s about meeting a community need in an innovative way," said Laura Norton Amico.

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Big crime meets big data

Big crime meets big data

Data and social media are being used against us in creative new ways.

Marc Goodman, consultant and cyber crime expert, explains how criminals and terrorists can put data, automation, and scalability to effective use.

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From crowdsourcing to crime-sourcing: The rise of distributed criminality

From crowdsourcing to crime-sourcing: The rise of distributed criminality

How criminals are applying crowdsourcing techniques.

Crowdsourcing began as a way to tap the wisdom of crowds for the betterment of business and science. Crime groups have now repurposed the same tools and techniques for their own variation: "crime-sourcing."

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