"csharp" entries

Learn a C-style language

Improve your odds with the lingua franca of computing.

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You have a lot of choices when you’re picking a programming language to learn. If you look around the web development world, you’ll see a lot of JavaScript. At universities and high schools, you’ll often find Python used as a teaching language. If you go to conferences with language theorists, like Strange Loop, you’ll hear a lot about functional languages, such as Haskell, Scala, and Erlang. This level of choice is good: many languages mean that the overall state of the field is continually evolving, and coming up with new solutions. That choice also leads to a certain amount of confusion regarding what you should learn. It’s not possible to learn every language out there, even if you wanted to. Depending on the area you’re in, the choice of language may be made for you. For the overall health of your career, and to provide you the widest range of future opportunities, the single most useful language-related thing you can do is learn a C-style language.

A boring old C-style language just like millions of developers learned before you, going back to the 1980s and earlier. It’s not flashy, it’s usually not cutting edge, but it is smart. Even if you don’t stick with it, or program in it on a daily basis, having a C-style language in your repertoire is a no-brainer if you want to be taken seriously as a developer.
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.NET open source

Microsoft .Net Team Program Manager, Beth Massi, on the open source .NET Core.

wire mesh

You might have heard the news that .NET is open source. In this post I’m going to explain what exactly we open sourced, why we did it, and how you can get involved.

Defining .NET

If you’re not familiar with .NET, it’s a managed execution environment that provides a variety of services to its running applications including things like automatic memory management, type safety, native interop, and multiple modern programming languages that make it easier to build all kinds of apps, for nearly any device, quickly. The first version of .NET was initially released in 2002 and quickly picked up steam in many businesses. Today there are over 1.8 billion active installs of the .NET Framework and 6 million .NET developers in the world.

The .NET Framework consists of these major components: the common language runtime (CLR), which is the execution engine that handles running applications; the .NET Framework Base Class Libraries (BCL), which provides a library of tested, reusable code that developers can call from their own applications; and the managed languages and compilers for C#, F#, and Visual Basic. Application models extend the common libraries of the .NET Framework to provide additional libraries that developers can use to build specific types of applications, like web, desktop, mobile device apps, etc. For more information on all the components in .NET 2015 see: Understanding .NET 2015.

There are multiple implementations of .NET, some from Microsoft and others from other companies or open source projects. In this post, I’ll focus on .NET Core from Microsoft.

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Static analysis with C#

Complement a good testing program and identify hard-to-find bugs with static analysis.

Static analysis is, quite simply, any analysis you perform on software without actually running it. (Analyzing software as it runs is dynamic analysis.) There are many reasons to do static analysis, but almost all of them boil down to the desire to improve software quality. As a designer of developer tools, improving software quality by any means is keenly important to me.

Let’s consider compiler warnings. They are produced without executing the code, so the compiler is doing static analysis. Their aim is to inform the developer that the code, though legal, is probably wrong. Suppose you were a compiler developer and you wanted to add a new warning; what characteristics must that warning have?

  • There must be some statically identifiable pattern to the suspicious code.
  • The pattern must be common and plausibly written by a developer; developing a warning for a too-rare pattern or completely unrealistic code is effort that could be better spent on other features.
  • The warning must have a low “false positive” rate; a warning must actually identify defective code more than, say, 99% of the time. False positives encourage developers to eliminate the warning by turning the warning off, or worse, by incorrectly changing the code. There must be a way to eliminate the warning without introducing a bug into the code.
  • The pattern must be identified extremely Slowing the build process by anything more than a few percent is unacceptable.

I always recommend that everyone use the strictest warning settings on their compiler, to pay attention to warnings, and to (carefully) fix them all. Even fix the false positives; if the code was weird enough to fool the compiler then it’s weird enough to fool a human, and you don’t want to have “expected” warnings distracting you from actual warnings.
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Where apps end and the system begins

Exploring the system calls and control flow that underpin high-level languages.

Editor’s note: Sometimes we can forget how important it is to truly understand how a system works, and how the nuts and bolts affect our everyday activities. Marty Kalin asks us to dive a little deeper and strengthen our computational thinking abilities.

It’s clear that applications need system resources to execute: a processor, memory, and usually I/O devices such as the keyboard and screen. It’s less clear how applications gain access to these shared resources, which are under operating system (OS) control. The OS, like any good manager, is efficient and unobtrusive as it handles resource requests from applications. Let’s take a look at how applications interact with the OS, in both routine and dramatic fashion.

Consider what happens when a print statement executes. Here’s a Ruby example:

The Ruby puts statement wraps a call to a high-level I/O function in the standard C library (in this case, printf), which acts as the interface between resource-requesting applications and resource-granting OS routines. In this example, the screen is the requested resource. The standard library interacts seamlessly with the OS, which also is written in C with some assembly language. The library function printf is high-level because, as the f in the name indicates, the function can format the bytes to be written as integers, floating-point values, and character strings such as Hello, world!. In systems-speak, the Ruby application and the C library function execute in user space, which does not bestow the rights and privileges needed to control system resources such as the screen.

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