ENTRIES TAGGED "database"

Four short links: 12 September 2012

Four short links: 12 September 2012

Time-Series Database, Multi-Device TV, C# to Javascript, and Tiny Research

  1. Seriesly — time-series database written in go.
  2. Tablets and TV (Luke Wroblewski) — In August 2012, 77% of TV viewers used another device at the same time in a typical day. 81% used a smartphone and TV at the same time. 66% used a laptop and TV at the same time.
  3. Saltarelle — open source (Apache2) C# to Javascript compiler. (via Javascript Weekly)
  4. Tiny Transactions on Computer Science — computer science research in 140 characters or fewer.
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Heavy data and architectural convergence

Data is getting heavier relative to the networks that carry it around the data center.

Imagine a future where large clusters of like machines dynamically adapt between programming paradigms depending on a combination of the resident data and the required processing.

Comment: 1
Four short links: 15 March 2012

Four short links: 15 March 2012

Javascript STM, HTML5 Game Mashup, BerkeleyDB Architecture, and API Ontologies

  1. atomize.jsa distributed Software Transactional Memory implementation in Javascript.
  2. mari0 — not only a great demonstration of what’s possible in web games, but also a clever mashup of Mario and Portal.
  3. Lessons From BerkeleyDB — chapter on BerkeleyDB’s design, architecture, and development philosophy from Architecture of Open Source Applications. (via Pete Warden)
  4. An API Ontology I currently see most real-world deployed APIs fit into a few different categories. All have their pros and cons, and it’s important to see how they relate to one other.
Comments: 2
Top stories: February 6-10, 2012

Top stories: February 6-10, 2012

The NoSQL movement, a victory for the web, and it's time to end DRM and embrace a unified ebook format.

This week on O'Reilly: Mike Loukides surveyed the NoSQL database landscape, the open web scored an important victory in court, and Joe Wikert said it's time to embrace a unified ebook format and abandon DRM.

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Helping educators find the right stuff

Helping educators find the right stuff

The Learning Registry looks to crack the education resource discovery problem.

There are countless repositories of high-quality content available to teachers, but it is still nearly impossible to find content to use with a particular lesson plan for a particular grade aligned to particular standards. That's where the Department of Education's new Learning Registry comes in.

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Oracle's NoSQL

Oracle's NoSQL Database is more than a product. It's also an acknowledgement.

Oracle's announcement of a NoSQL product isn't just a validation of key-value stores, but of the entire discussion of database architecture.

Comments: 4

Oracle’s NoSQL

Oracle's NoSQL Database is more than a product. It's also an acknowledgement.

Oracle's announcement of a NoSQL product isn't just a validation of key-value stores, but of the entire discussion of database architecture.

Comments: 4
What CouchDB can do for HTML5, web apps and mobile

What CouchDB can do for HTML5, web apps and mobile

The utility of CouchApps and how CouchDB could shape mobile.

OSCON speaker Bradley Holt talks about what CouchDB offers web developers, how the database works with HTML5, and why CouchApps could catch on.

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Four short links: 14 March 2011

Four short links: 14 March 2011

Future Retrospective, Political Entrepreneurs, Library DRM, and In-Database Analytics

  1. A History of the Future in 100 Objects (Kickstarter) — blog+podcast+video+book project, to have future historians tell the story of our century in 100 objects. The BBC show that inspired it was brilliant, and I rather suspect this will be too. It’s a clever way to tell a story of the future (his hardest problem will be creating a single coherent narrative for the 21st century). What are the 100 objects that future historians will use to sum up our century? ‘Smart drugs’ that change the way we think? A fragment from suitcase nuke detonated in Shanghai? A wedding ring between a human and an AI? The world’s most expensive glass of water, returned from a private mission to an asteroid? (via RIG London weekly notes)
  2. Entrepreneurs Who Create Value vs Entrepreneurs Who Lock Up Value (Andy Kessler) — distinguishes between “political entrepreneurs” who leverage their political power to own something and then overcharge or tax the crap out of the rest of us to use it vs “market entrepreneurs” who recognize the price-to-value gap and jump in. Ignoring legislation, they innovate, disintermediate, compete, stay up all night coding, and offer something better and cheaper until the market starts to shift. My attention was particularly caught by for every stroke of the pen, for every piece of legislation, for every paid-off congressman, there now exists a price umbrella that overvalues what he or any political entrepreneur is doing. (via Bryce Roberts)
  3. Harper-Collins Caps eBook Loans — The publisher wants to sell libraries DRMed ebooks that will self-destruct after 26 loans. Public libraries have always served and continue to serve those people who can’t access information on the purchase market. Jackass moves like these prevent libraries from serving those people in the future that we hope will come soon: the future where digital is default and print is premium. That premium may well be “the tentacles of soulless bottom-dwelling coprocephalic publishers can’t digitally destroy your purchase”. It’s worth noting that O’Reilly offers DRM-free PDFs of the books they publish, including mine. Own what you buy lest it own you. (via BoingBoing and many astonished library sources)
  4. MAD Lib — BSD-licensed open-source library for scalable in-database analytics. It provides data-parallel implementations of mathematical, statistical and machine learning methods for structured and unstructured data. (via Ted Leung)
Comment: 1
Hadoop: What it is, how it works, and what it can do

Hadoop: What it is, how it works, and what it can do

Cloudera CEO Mike Olson on Hadoop's architecture and its data applications.

Hadoop gets a lot of buzz in database circles, but some folks are still hazy about what it is and how it works. In this interview, Cloudera CEO and Strata speaker Mike Olson discusses Hadoop's background and its current utility.

Comments: 36