ENTRIES TAGGED "database"

Four short links: 14 March 2011

Four short links: 14 March 2011

Future Retrospective, Political Entrepreneurs, Library DRM, and In-Database Analytics

  1. A History of the Future in 100 Objects (Kickstarter) — blog+podcast+video+book project, to have future historians tell the story of our century in 100 objects. The BBC show that inspired it was brilliant, and I rather suspect this will be too. It’s a clever way to tell a story of the future (his hardest problem will be creating a single coherent narrative for the 21st century). What are the 100 objects that future historians will use to sum up our century? ‘Smart drugs’ that change the way we think? A fragment from suitcase nuke detonated in Shanghai? A wedding ring between a human and an AI? The world’s most expensive glass of water, returned from a private mission to an asteroid? (via RIG London weekly notes)
  2. Entrepreneurs Who Create Value vs Entrepreneurs Who Lock Up Value (Andy Kessler) — distinguishes between “political entrepreneurs” who leverage their political power to own something and then overcharge or tax the crap out of the rest of us to use it vs “market entrepreneurs” who recognize the price-to-value gap and jump in. Ignoring legislation, they innovate, disintermediate, compete, stay up all night coding, and offer something better and cheaper until the market starts to shift. My attention was particularly caught by for every stroke of the pen, for every piece of legislation, for every paid-off congressman, there now exists a price umbrella that overvalues what he or any political entrepreneur is doing. (via Bryce Roberts)
  3. Harper-Collins Caps eBook Loans — The publisher wants to sell libraries DRMed ebooks that will self-destruct after 26 loans. Public libraries have always served and continue to serve those people who can’t access information on the purchase market. Jackass moves like these prevent libraries from serving those people in the future that we hope will come soon: the future where digital is default and print is premium. That premium may well be “the tentacles of soulless bottom-dwelling coprocephalic publishers can’t digitally destroy your purchase”. It’s worth noting that O’Reilly offers DRM-free PDFs of the books they publish, including mine. Own what you buy lest it own you. (via BoingBoing and many astonished library sources)
  4. MAD Lib — BSD-licensed open-source library for scalable in-database analytics. It provides data-parallel implementations of mathematical, statistical and machine learning methods for structured and unstructured data. (via Ted Leung)
Comment: 1
Hadoop: What it is, how it works, and what it can do

Hadoop: What it is, how it works, and what it can do

Cloudera CEO Mike Olson on Hadoop's architecture and its data applications.

Hadoop gets a lot of buzz in database circles, but some folks are still hazy about what it is and how it works. In this interview, Cloudera CEO and Strata speaker Mike Olson discusses Hadoop's background and its current utility.

Comments: 36
Big data faster: A conversation with Bradford Stephens

Big data faster: A conversation with Bradford Stephens

The founder of Drawn to Scale explains how his database platform does simple things quickly.

Bradford Stephens, founder of of Drawn to Scale, discusses big data systems that work in "user time."

Comments: 2

The growing importance of data journalism

Parsing the progress of open government data requires new tools and reliable information sources.

Data journalists now have huge volumes of accessible government data, but a recent panel discussion reveals that cultural roadblocks and "dirty" data still need to be addressed.

Comments: 4

Strata Gems: Turn MySQL into blazing fast NoSQL

Bypass the SQL parser to use MySQL's raw speed

The HandlerSocket plugin for MySQL bypasses the query parser to deliver excellent NoSQL performance, rivaling that of memcache.

Comment: 1

Strata Gems: Who needs disks anyway?

RethinkDB uses SSDs to their full advantage

Today's databases are designed for the spinning platter of the hard disk. As SSDs begin to enter data centers, it's time for a database that takes advantage of the new technology.

Comments: 4
Four short links: 15 December 2010

Four short links: 15 December 2010

Google Database, Text UI, Sustainable Education, Font Basics

  1. Dremel (PDF) — paper on the Dremel distributed nested column-store database developed at Google. Interesting beyond the technology is the list of uses, which includes tracking install data for applications on Android Market; crash reporting from Google products; OCR results from Google Books; spam analysis; debugging map tiles. (via Greg Linden)
  2. Conversational UI: A Short Reading List — it can be difficult to build a text user interface to a bot because there’s not a great body of useful literature around textual UIs the way there is around GUIs. This great list of pointers goes a long way to solving that problem.
  3. Sustainable Education (YouTube) — Watch this clip from the New Zealand Open Source Awards. Mark Osborne, Deputy Principal from Albany Senior High School, talks about the software choices at their school not because it’s right for technology but because it’s right for the students. Very powerful.
  4. What Font Should I Use? — design life support for the terminally tasteless like myself. (via Hacker News)
Comments: 2
Big data, but with a familiar face

Big data, but with a familiar face

Martin Hall explains how Karmasphere is integrating Hadoop into enterprises.

You don't have to throw away existing investments in skills and tools to use Hadoop for big data, as Karmasphere's Martin Hall explains.

Comments: 2
Four short links: 21 October 2010

Four short links: 21 October 2010

MySQL as NoSQL, Handmade SLR, Mac App Store, and Datamining Privacy Workshop

  1. Using MysQL as NoSQL750,000+ qps on a commodity MySQL/InnoDB 5.1 server from remote web clients.
  2. Making an SLR Camera from Scratch — amazing piece of hardware devotion. (via hackaday.com)
  3. Mac App Store Guidelines — Apple announce an app store for the Macintosh, similar to its app store for iPhones and iPads. “Mac App” no longer means generic “program”, it has a new and specific meaning, a program that must be installed through the App store and which has limited functionality (only one can run at a time, it’s full-screen, etc.). The list of guidelines for what kinds of programs you can’t sell through the App Store is interesting. Many have good reasons to be, but It creates a store inside itself for selling or distributing other software (i.e., an audio plug-in store in an audio app) is pure greed. Some are afeared that the next step is to make the App store the only way to install apps on a Mac, a move that would drive me away. It would be a sad day for Mac-lovers if Microsoft were to be the more open solution than Apple. cf the Owner’s Manifesto.
  4. Privacy Aspects of Data Mining — CFP for an IEEE workshop in December. (via jschneider on Twitter)
Comments: 4
Four short links: 24 September 2010

Four short links: 24 September 2010

Crawlable Ajax, Security Lessons, Graph Database, and Toy Hardware

  1. Making Ajax Applications Crawlable (Google) — Google’s system for allowing Ajax applications to provide HTML snapshots for search engines. (via alexdong on twitter)
  2. Security Lessons Learned from the Diaspora Launch — great explanation of the programming mistakes that were in the Diaspora code, and the security risks that resulted. Again, I recommend the OWASP site if you aren’t aware of the types of security mistakes you are making.
  3. A Brief Tour of Graphd — the triplestore behind Freebase. Want. (via timclicks on Twitter)
  4. Toybots — startup working on Internet-aware hardware for toymakers: 3G, WiFi, GPS, and accelerometer waiting to be embedded in toys.
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