ENTRIES TAGGED "design patterns"

Think Functionally to Simplify Code

Let the environment do more of the work

Functional programming keeps growing. While it has long been a popular topic in academic circles, and many of my CS-educated friends wonder why it took me so long to discover it, the shift in approach that functional programming requires made it a hard sell in the commercial world. As our computers have become more and more powerful and our problems more complex, functional programming approaches and environments seem better able to shoulder those loads.

Neal Ford, Meme Wrangler at ThoughtWorks, has been showing developers how to shift from classic imperative models to cleaner functional approaches. I was lucky to get to talk with him at OSCON, and we’ve also posted his OSCON talk, with many more concrete code examples.

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Insights on speaking, writing, and working with MongoDB

An interview with Rick Copeland, the author of MongoDB Applied Design Patterns

At a recent MongoDB SF event, I had a chance to meet Rick Copeland. He was in town and stopped by the event to sign copies of his book, MongoDB Applied Design Patterns. While I am not Rick’s editor, I approached him to see if he would be okay with me filming the book signing as well as participating in a follow-up written interview. He agreed. It was great to catch a bit of footage of the event as well as have a chance to ask Rick about how he started working with MongoDB, why he wrote the book, and how he balances a busy schedule filled with working, writing, and speaking.

How did you get started working with MongoDB?

Rick Copeland: I started using MongoDB at Sourceforge in 2009. Just before I came on board, the decision had been made to base the next generation of SourceForge on MongoDB instead of relational databases. The driving factors behind this decision were some internally-conducted benchmarks and a developer love of the document-oriented model.

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How you can stop trashing PHP code

Design patterns for PHP

William Sanders (@williebegoode) is a Professor of Interactive Information Technology at the University of Hartford and author of over 40 technical books! His latest book with us is Learning PHP Design Patterns. We recently sat down to talk about design patterns and how they can help create reusable code and save you valuable time. You can also check out more from Bill at his website.

  • Why use design patterns for PHP? [Discussed at the 0:28 mark.]
  • Big programs and lots of code can become unwieldy [Discussed at the 2:06 mark.]
  • Mobile devices and PHP design patterns [Discussed at the 5:30 mark.]
  • Bill talks common design patterns and how they help [Discussed at the 7:25 mark.]
  • How to start using design patterns with PHP [Discussed at the 10:15 mark.]

You can view the entire interview in the following video:

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Four short links: 19 December 2011

Four short links: 19 December 2011

Version Control, Web-based ID, Mobile Design, and Node.js Tools

  1. The History of Version Control (Francis Irving) — concise history of the key advances in managing source code versions. Worth it just for the delicious apposition of “history” and “version control”.
  2. BrowserID — Mozilla’s authentication solution. BrowserID aims to provide a secure way of proving your identity to servers across the Internet, without having to create separate usernames and passwords each time. Instead of a new username, it uses your email address as your identity which allows it to be decentralized since anyone can send you an email verification message. It’s currently implemented via JavaScript but hopefully it will be built into the browser in the future. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. A Look Inside Mobile Design Patterns — Sample chapter on how different apps handle invitations, from a new [O'Reilly-published, huzzah!] book on mobile design patterns. (via David Kaneda)
  4. Node Toolbox — concise compendium of resources for node.js development.
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Four short links: 4 March 2011

Four short links: 4 March 2011

Javascript AR, Android Patterns, Node.js Book, and SMS Platforms

  1. JSARToolKit — Javascript port of the Flash AR Toolkit. I’m intrigued because the iPad2 has rear-facing camera and gyroscopes up the wazoo, and (of course) no Flash. (via Mike Shaver on Twitter)
  2. Android Patterns — set of design patterns for Android apps. (via Josh Clark on Twitter)
  3. Preview of Up and Running with Node.js (O’Reilly) — Tom Hughes-Croucher’s new book in preview form. Just sorting out commenting now. (via Tom on Twitter)
  4. #Blue Opens for Business — a web app that gets your text messages. You can reply, and there’s an API to give other apps read/write access. Signs the text message is finally becoming a consumer platform.
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Four short links: 1 March 2011

Four short links: 1 March 2011

Controlling Standards, Async Persistence, Javascript Patterns, Social Mechanics

  1. Implementing Open Standards in Open Source (Larry Rosen) — Companies try to control specifications because they want to control software that implements those specifications. This is often incompatible with the freedom promised by open source principles that allow anyone to create and distribute copies and derivative works without restriction. This article explores ways that are available to compromise that incompatibility and to make open standards work for open source. (via Sam Ruby)
  2. Easy WebSocket — simple Javascript client for WebSockets. (via Lucas Gonze on Twitter)
  3. Essential Javascript Design Patterns — updated book of Javascript design patterns.
  4. Social Mechanics (Raph Koster) — a taxonomy of social mechanics in games. See also Alice Taylor’s notes. (via BoingBoing)
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