ENTRIES TAGGED "design patterns"

Four short links: 19 December 2011

Four short links: 19 December 2011

Version Control, Web-based ID, Mobile Design, and Node.js Tools

  1. The History of Version Control (Francis Irving) — concise history of the key advances in managing source code versions. Worth it just for the delicious apposition of “history” and “version control”.
  2. BrowserID — Mozilla’s authentication solution. BrowserID aims to provide a secure way of proving your identity to servers across the Internet, without having to create separate usernames and passwords each time. Instead of a new username, it uses your email address as your identity which allows it to be decentralized since anyone can send you an email verification message. It’s currently implemented via JavaScript but hopefully it will be built into the browser in the future. (via Nelson Minar)
  3. A Look Inside Mobile Design Patterns — Sample chapter on how different apps handle invitations, from a new [O'Reilly-published, huzzah!] book on mobile design patterns. (via David Kaneda)
  4. Node Toolbox — concise compendium of resources for node.js development.
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Four short links: 4 March 2011

Four short links: 4 March 2011

Javascript AR, Android Patterns, Node.js Book, and SMS Platforms

  1. JSARToolKit — Javascript port of the Flash AR Toolkit. I’m intrigued because the iPad2 has rear-facing camera and gyroscopes up the wazoo, and (of course) no Flash. (via Mike Shaver on Twitter)
  2. Android Patterns — set of design patterns for Android apps. (via Josh Clark on Twitter)
  3. Preview of Up and Running with Node.js (O’Reilly) — Tom Hughes-Croucher’s new book in preview form. Just sorting out commenting now. (via Tom on Twitter)
  4. #Blue Opens for Business — a web app that gets your text messages. You can reply, and there’s an API to give other apps read/write access. Signs the text message is finally becoming a consumer platform.
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Four short links: 1 March 2011

Four short links: 1 March 2011

Controlling Standards, Async Persistence, Javascript Patterns, Social Mechanics

  1. Implementing Open Standards in Open Source (Larry Rosen) — Companies try to control specifications because they want to control software that implements those specifications. This is often incompatible with the freedom promised by open source principles that allow anyone to create and distribute copies and derivative works without restriction. This article explores ways that are available to compromise that incompatibility and to make open standards work for open source. (via Sam Ruby)
  2. Easy WebSocket — simple Javascript client for WebSockets. (via Lucas Gonze on Twitter)
  3. Essential Javascript Design Patterns — updated book of Javascript design patterns.
  4. Social Mechanics (Raph Koster) — a taxonomy of social mechanics in games. See also Alice Taylor’s notes. (via BoingBoing)
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