ENTRIES TAGGED "ebooks"

Publishing News:  B&N closes doors on Amazon Publishing

Publishing News: B&N closes doors on Amazon Publishing

B&N shuns Amazon, Goodreads shuns Amazon, Jonathan Franzen shuns ebooks.

Barnes & Noble ramped up its battle with Amazon this week by shutting it out of its stores. Elsewhere, Goodreads broke up with Amazon’s data API and Jonathan Franzen declared ebooks will be the downfall of civilization.

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Four short links: 27 January 2012

Four short links: 27 January 2012

Hosting Jurisdiction, Net Serendipity, Kindle Autographs, and Text Box Hackery

  1. Data Jurisdiction — information from the NineFold hosting company in Australia. Has some Aussie-specific content, but would be great to see this internationalized. (via Lachlan Hardy)
  2. Anatomy of an Idea (Steven Johnson) — people who think the Web is killing off serendipity are not using it correctly. Lovely glimpse at how he works, chasing trails of ideas down and using Google and Twitter for research. (via Maria Popova)
  3. Autograph Stickers for Kindle Books (Clay Johnson) — clever solution to the “but I can’t get my Kindle book autographed!”.
  4. TextExt.js — Javascript to extend textboxes with tags, prompting, autocomplete, and more. (via Javascript Weekly)
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The five things you need to pay attention to at TOC 2012

The five things you need to pay attention to at TOC 2012

Publishing startups, data, and ebook quality are among TOC 2012's key topics.

Tools of Change for Publishing chairs Kat Meyer and Joe Wikert reveal their top recommendations for things to see, do and watch at the upcoming conference.

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The art of marrying content with mobile apps

The art of marrying content with mobile apps

Gurvinder Batra on KiwiTech's publishing-specific approach.

In this TOC Podcast, KiwiTech founder and CTO Gurvinder Batra talks about how his company masters the challenges of developing apps for the publishing industry. He also says native apps are a better option than EPUB.

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Four short links: 13 January 2012

Four short links: 13 January 2012

Internet in Culture, Flash Security Tool, Haptic E-Books, and Facebook Mining Private Updates

  1. How The Internet Gets Inside Us (The New Yorker) — at any given moment, our most complicated machine will be taken as a model of human intelligence, and whatever media kids favor will be identified as the cause of our stupidity. When there were automatic looms, the mind was like an automatic loom; and, since young people in the loom period liked novels, it was the cheap novel that was degrading our minds. When there were telephone exchanges, the mind was like a telephone exchange, and, in the same period, since the nickelodeon reigned, moving pictures were making us dumb. When mainframe computers arrived and television was what kids liked, the mind was like a mainframe and television was the engine of our idiocy. Some machine is always showing us Mind; some entertainment derived from the machine is always showing us Non-Mind. (via Tom Armitage)
  2. SWFScan — Windows-only Flash decompiler to find hardcoded credentials, keys, and URLs. (via Mauricio Freitas)
  3. Paranga — haptic interface for flipping through an ebook. (via Ben Bashford)
  4. Facebook Gives Politico Deep Access to Users Political Sentiments (All Things D) — Facebook will analyse all public and private updates that mention candidates and an exclusive partner will “use” the results. Remember, if you’re not paying for it then you’re the product and not the customer.
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Four short links: 10 January 2012

Four short links: 10 January 2012

Emotional Phone, Standup Desk, Mobile Sensors, and eBook Travails

  1. Samsung Develops Emotion-Sensing Smartphone (ExtremeTech) — By analyzing how fast you type, how much the phone shakes, how often you backspace mistakes, and how many special symbols are used, the special Galaxy S II can work out whether you’re angry, surprised, happy, sad, fearful, or disgusted, with an accuracy of 67.5% From a research paper from a research group on an unannounced product. Nice idea and clever use of incidental data, though 2/3 accuracy isn’t something to write home about. Reminds me of Sandy Pentland‘s Reality Mining. (via James Governor)
  2. The $40 Standup Desk — we’ve solved the usability of software, but hardware remains stubbornly dangerous to use. There’s a reason nobody refers to “laptops” any more (if you use them on your lap, you might as well call them “wristkillers”).
  3. funfan extensible sensing and data processing framework for mobile devices being developed at the MIT Media Lab [...] an open source, reusable set of functionalities, enabling the collection, uploading, and configuration of a wide range of data types. LGPL, Android.
  4. eBook Publishing Isn’t That Easy — list of the things you have to worry about when you self-publish. This line is gold: Locating a distributor. Amazon pays me 17 bucks for a 50-dollar book. Can you say “assholes?” LuLu pays me 43 bucks, but only if you buy on their site. Do the math. Platform vendors own authors and small publishers. (via Josh Clark)
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Quid pro quo will define the author-publisher relationship

Quid pro quo will define the author-publisher relationship

Peter Meyers on HTML5, ebook formats and the evolution of publishers and authors.

In this video interview, author and digital book producer Peter Meyers addresses the state of ebooks and book apps and weighs in on the changing relationship between authors and publishers.

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Ebook refunds and absolute satisfaction

Why no-questions-asked ebook refund policies work.

Joe Wikert says if you trust your customers with a generous ebook returns policy, they'll pay you back with loyalty and future business.

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Top Stories: November 7-11, 2011

Top Stories: November 7-11, 2011

Tim O'Reilly on ebooks, confessions of a not-so-public speaker, and why social network analysis matters.

This week on O'Reilly: Tim O'Reilly looked at the past and future of ebooks, Suzanne Axtell shared her first steps toward becoming a public speaker, and we learned that social network analysis goes far beyond social networks.

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Four short links: 11 November 2011

Four short links: 11 November 2011

Technocracy's Blind Spot, Progressive Enhancement, Libraries and ebooks, and Library Fablab

  1. Nudge Policies Are Another Name for Coercion (New Scientist) — This points to the key problem with “nudge” style paternalism: presuming that technocrats understand what ordinary people want better than the people themselves. There is no reason to think technocrats know better, especially since Thaler and Sunstein offer no means for ordinary people to comment on, let alone correct, the technocrats’ prescriptions. This leaves the technocrats with no systematic way of detecting their own errors, correcting them, or learning from them. And technocracy is bound to blunder, especially when it is not democratically accountable. Take heed, all you Gov 2.0 wouldbe-hackers. (via BoingBoing)
  2. Country Selector — turns a dropdown into an autocomplete field where available. Very nice! (via Chris Shiflett)
  3. Ebook Users Wanted — Pew Internet & American Life project looking at ebooks, looking for people who use ebooks and tablet readers in libraries.
  4. The Public Library, Complete Reimagined (KQED) — the Fayetteville public library is putting in a fab lab. [L]ibraries aren’t just about books. They are about free access to information and to technology — and not just to reading books or using computers, but actually building and making things. (via BoingBoing)
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