ENTRIES TAGGED "email"

Four short links: 7 September 2009

Four short links: 7 September 2009

XMPP, Future of Web Frameworks, Infrastructure Stories, Better Email Client

  1. App Engine Now Supports XMPP (Jabber) — messaging servers, whether XMPP or PubSubHubBub, are becoming an increasingly important way to loosely join the small pieces. Google’s incorporation of XMPP into GAE reflects this (and the fact that Wave is built on XMPP). (via StPeter on Twitter)
  2. Snakes on the Web (Jacob Kaplan-Moss) — The best way to predict the future of web development, I think, is to keep asking ourselves the question that led to all the past advances: what sucks, and how can we fix it? So: what sucks about web development? An excellent and thought-provoking talk about the possible directions for improvement in web framework design.
  3. Ravelry (Tim Bray) — We’ve got 430,000 registered users, in a month we’ll see 200,000 of those, about 135,000 in a week and about 70,000 in a day. We peak at 3.6 million pageviews per day. That’s registered users only (doesn’t include the very few pages that are Google accessible) and does not include the usual API calls, RSS feeds, AJAX. [...] We have 7 servers running Gentoo Linux and virtualized into a total of 13 virtual servers with Xen. [...]“. Interesting technical and business discussion with an unexpected busy site.
  4. So’s Your Facet: Faceted Global Search for Mozilla Thunderbird — email clients are LONG overdue for improvement. Encouraging to see an active and open research project to improve it from the folks at Mozilla Messaging.
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Four short links: 23 June 2009

Four short links: 23 June 2009

  1. Easter Eggs for Real Life (Neil Gaiman) — ok, I know easter eggs are already part of real life, but this is still cool. Gaiman recommends a restaurant run by a friend, and the friend has set up a special phrase that to mention to the server, at which point something good and special will happen for them to eat or drink. Think of it as a restaurant Easter Egg. I love language, I love Gaiman’s books, I love surprises, and I love that here Gaiman’s using the digital sense of Easter Egg (surprise hidden in a program) rather than the analog sense (because there’s no searching involved).
  2. ASCAP Wants To Be Paid When Your Phone Rings (EFF) — what the title suggests. You are lost in a twisty maze of rights, all policed by vampires. From ASCAP’s point of view, this is a legitimate claim. From anyone else’s point of view, it’s ridiculous.
  3. Tooling Up The Body (MInd Hacks) — using tools has lots of interesting effects on our perception is the general gist of an intriguing study that provides further evidence for the theory that the brain treats tools as temporary body parts. We talk about using the Internet as our “offsite brain”, so it tickles me to learn that the brain treats tools as offsite body parts.
  4. Email Patterns Can Predict Impending Doom (New Scientist) — when Enron was about to collapse, email patterns changed: the number of active email cliques, defined as groups in which every member has had direct email contact with every other member, jumped from 100 to almost 800 around a month before the December 2001 collapse. Messages were also increasingly exchanged within these groups and not shared with other employees. Menezes thinks he and Collingsworth may have identified a characteristic change that occurs as stress builds within a company: employees start talking directly to people they feel comfortable with, and stop sharing information more widely. (via BoingBoing)
Comments: 2
Four short links: 11 May 2009

Four short links: 11 May 2009

Healthcare, Diagrams, Social Networking, and Email

  1. OSCAR Canada — open source healthcare (EMR) software, akin to VistA. See linuxmednews.com for more.
  2. Instaviz — iPhone app for mindmapping/any other blob-and-line diagram. I’m hypnotised by the correction of a fuzzy hand-drawn circle into a clean crisp algorithmic circle.
  3. Buddypress — open source software that turns a WordPress installation into a social networking platform. Ok, so social networking software is now essentially free. What’s the next big thing that will as hard and new as social networking was in 2003?
  4. Getting Insight Into One’s Own Email — Thunderbird now shows interesting facts when there’s no message to look at: recently read messages, messages most likely to be interesting, and a histogram of activity.
Comments: 4

It’s at the Scene of the Crime, but it’s not the Criminal

People are saying technology is making us stupid. Technology is shattering our attention. Technology is ruining our children. Technology is making us busier than ever. Taking that train of thought a step further: technology can fix the problem. I believe we can make smarter email and smarter phones – and we should. It just won’t fix the problem. We can…

Comments: 7

RIP: Returned Every Email

I fell in love with email in 1983. I was a computer-savvy educator and children’s librarian teaching teachers about the new technologies 
available to them. Email came into my life, offering immediate gratification: no stamp, no trip to the post office, no phone tag, no long messages. Questions were answered quickly. Personal exchanges often felt as intimate as a written…

Comments: 10

Phone in the Toilet?

My friend Sara sent me an email: "Linda, Sorry that I'm not able to call you back. My phone fell into the toilet." We live in a world where phones can fall into toilets because our phones are following us everywhere. Untethered. Free. Free to fall into the toilet. Last week, a high school sophomore told me that she brings…

Comments: 8

Q&A with Susan Danziger, CEO of DailyLit

DailyLit has made a name for itself by delivering simple book installments via email and RSS. In this Q&A, DailyLit CEO Susan Danziger discusses the company's philosophy, process, and upcoming services.

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Diagnosis: Email Apnea?

I've just opened my email and there's nothing out of the ordinary there. It's the usual daily flood of schedule, project, travel, information, and junk mail. Then I notice. I'm holding my breath. As the email spills onto my screen, as my mind races with thoughts of what I'll answer first, what can wait, who I should call, what should…

Comments: 18

Stuffing Six Million Pages Down Google's Throat

I got two fascinating emails from Jason Hunter over the weekend, both concerning MarkMail, the open source mailing list search engine created by Ryan Grimm and Jason over at MarkLogic. I thought I'd share them, with Jason's permission. The first was a fairly prosaic announcement: In the last few weeks we loaded the PHP and PEAR mailing lists, a sum…

Comments: 23

Reducing Email Volume

It's unfashionable to admit these days, but 14 years after getting my first account, I still like email. Of course, the volume is crushing, and so lately, I've been experimenting with email reduction. I'm getting good results with two key concepts that hardly anyone talks about and that focus on your sending habits rather than your inbox management. First, send…

Comments: 13