ENTRIES TAGGED "enterprise"

Top Stories: August 22-26, 2011

Top Stories: August 22-26, 2011

The legacy of Steve Jobs, the sweet spot between data and art, and a deep dive into Google+

This week on O'Reilly: Mark Sigal examined the legacy of Steve Jobs, we talked with New York Times data artist Jer Thorp about the commingling of data, art and science, and Tim O'Reilly and Google VP of Product Bradley Horowitz discussed Google+, data portability and more.

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Five things Android needs to address on the enterprise side

Five things Android needs to address on the enterprise side

Android in the enterprise requires improvements in security, management and app stores.

Android has the foundation to support enterprise use, but there's a handful of missing pieces that need to be addressed if it's going to fully catch on in the corporate world.

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Is the enterprise dead as a tablet strategy?

Is the enterprise dead as a tablet strategy?

Conventional wisdom about the "consumerization of IT" is missing the big picture.

A confluence of factors, most notably the crash of the dotcom bubble and the rise of Apple, led to the consumerization of IT. But Mark Sigal says tablet makers are missing a golden opportunity by ignoring the enterprise.

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Knowledge management in the age of social media

Knowledge management in the age of social media

The days of the single, authoritative voice are coming to an end. The community has prevailed.

The shift to the adoption of social computing, somewhat driven by consumerization, points to one emergent observation: the future is about managing unstructured content.

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One foot in college, one foot in business

One foot in college, one foot in business

Joe Hellerstein on how enterprise-academic partnerships can help open source.

Joe Hellerstein, a professor in the UC Berkeley science department, explains how a new partnership model is improving the professional development around an open source project.

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Four short links: 19 January 2010

Four short links: 19 January 2010

Implementing REST, Teaching Exploration, reMAKEing the Enterprise, and Printing Titanium

  1. Implementing RESTThis is a place for exploring aspects of implementing applications using the REST architectural style. This may include statements about existing frameworks and libraries, general discussions about the nature of the style and how it may be expressed and/or encouraged via a programming framework, etc.
  2. When Teaching Restrains Discovery — read about this research (short story: the more specific the skills taught, the less exploratory students were) and think about how we teach people to program, how we teach them the company culture, how we teach them to succeed.
  3. The Maker Generation in the Enterprise (JP Rangaswami) — We have to get away from the idea that knowledge work is smooth and stable and uniform and assembly-line in structure and characteristic. Knowledge work is lumpy. Period. There will be peaks. And there will be troughs. The current thinking appears to go something like this: “If we have troughs it will look like we don’t have enough work to do, so we need to pretend to work. Let’s fill our days up in advance with things that don’t depend on market or customer stimulus, things we can plan well in advance. And let’s call these things meetings. Then we can look busy all the time.” Such thinking has produced some unworthwhile consequences.
  4. i.materialise 3D Printing in TitaniumTitanium’s high heat resistance, high accuracy and unparalleled strength lets designers now make things that before now could only be made by the research and development departments of only the largest corporations in the world. By putting this technology in the public’s hands were democratizing manufacturing and giving you the opportunity to, design and order something this is exactly as you want it to be. (via Chris Anderson on Twitter)
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Four short links: 10 December 2010

Four short links: 10 December 2010

Javascript Snowmarklet, Tech Startups, Enterprise Dropbox, and Cloud Contracts

  1. Let it Snow — bookmarklet from David Flanagan that makes Javascript snowflakes fall. Awww. (via Mike Loukides)
  2. You Can Work on Great Technology at StartupsThere are more innovative database startups at various stages in their life than I can remember right now. So true–waiting for the inevitable amalgamation, thinning out, etc. (via Nat Friedman on Twitter)
  3. Dropbox for Teams — an interesting package of features from a very innovative company. (via Hacker News)
  4. Cloud Computing ChecklistComparison and Analysis of the Terms and Conditions of Cloud Computing Services. What to look out for when signing a cloud contract. (via Rick Shera in email)
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Four short links: 15 November 2010

Four short links: 15 November 2010

Prison Blogging, 3D Hacks, Budget Simulation, and Enterprise Sales

  1. Between the Bars — snail-mail-to-blogs transcription service for prisoners, to make visible stories that would otherwise be missed. there is a religous program here called Kairo’s in the program inmates are given letters and drawings made by small children not one in that program did not cry, after reading the words of incouragement from those kids. An unmissable reminder of the complexity of human stories, suffering, and situations, the posts range from the banal to the riveting. (via Benjamin Mako Hill)
  2. Kinect Opensource News — a roundup of open source Kinect hacks. I like memo’s gestural interface the best. Impressive stuff for just a few days’ access to the open source drivers. (via Andy Baio)
  3. You Fix The Budget (NY Times) — a simpler version of Budget Hero, which lets you choose policies and see their effect on the deficit. Unlike Budget Hero, the NYT app doesn’t discuss non-deficit consequences of the actions (social consequences, ripple-on economic effects). Like Budget Hero, you can’t add your own policies: you’re forced to choose from the ones presented. Real life is more complex than this simulation, but even something this simple is powerful: by interacting with this, you understand the magnitude of (say) education vs healthcare, and you realize how much of the current debate is froth.
  4. Meet the New Enterprise Customer, a Lot like the Old Enterprise Customer — Ben Horowitz nails the difficulty of selling to the enterprise, and drives a stake through the “they’ll buy our service with their credit cards, like consumers do” myth. xcellent enterprise sales reps will guide a company through their own purchasing processes. Without an enterprise sales rep, many companies literally do not know how to buy new technology products. (via Mike Olson on Twitter)
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Better, faster, cheaper … emergent

Better, faster, cheaper … emergent

Commentary: "Beltway bandits" are the result of government complexity.

In this response to Carl Malamud's Gov 2.0 Summit speech, Jim Stogdill says that demonizing the "beltway bandits" without addressing the root cause — the lock-in incentives inherent in a single-customer market — will just lead to new ways to lock them in. Fixing government IT means fixing incentives and making the cognitive leap to intentional emergence.

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Four short links: 6 September 2010

Four short links: 6 September 2010

Game Engine, Enterprise Twitteralike, Open Microbiome, and Good Mental Habits

  1. Akihabara (Github) — open source (GPL2 and MIT dual-licensed) HTML5/Javascript engine for classic arcade games. (via chadfowler on Twitter)
  2. Eureka Streams — open sourced Java app for enterprise Twitter-like activity: build a profile, join groups, post updates, subscribe to updates from individuals or groups. (via dlpeters on Twitter)
  3. Open Microbiome — hoping to build open tools, standard samples, data, and metadata for analysis of the microbiome (all the microorganisms that live in, on, and with macroorganisms like us). Early days, but glad to see people are already thinking of building this research open from the ground up. And if you think sequencing the human genome gave us a lot of data we struggle to find patterns in, wait until you start including microorganisms: we have 10x as many bacteria in us as we have cells and the species variety is vast. (via phylogenomics on Twitter)
  4. Habits of Mathematical Minds — fantastic list of skills and approaches that are hallmarks of many successful minds, not just in mathematics. (via ddmeyer on Twitter)
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