"game" entries

Reality has a gaming layer

Reality has a gaming layer

Kevin Slavin sees a world where games shape life and life shapes games.

Kevin Slavin, managing director of Area/Code and a speaker at Web 2.0 Expo New York, has worked at the the intersection of games and reality for nearly a decade. In this interview, Slavin explores the impact of mobile apps and the unexpected ways games shape our lives.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 6 September 2010

Four short links: 6 September 2010

Game Engine, Enterprise Twitteralike, Open Microbiome, and Good Mental Habits

  1. Akihabara (Github) — open source (GPL2 and MIT dual-licensed) HTML5/Javascript engine for classic arcade games. (via chadfowler on Twitter)
  2. Eureka Streams — open sourced Java app for enterprise Twitter-like activity: build a profile, join groups, post updates, subscribe to updates from individuals or groups. (via dlpeters on Twitter)
  3. Open Microbiome — hoping to build open tools, standard samples, data, and metadata for analysis of the microbiome (all the microorganisms that live in, on, and with macroorganisms like us). Early days, but glad to see people are already thinking of building this research open from the ground up. And if you think sequencing the human genome gave us a lot of data we struggle to find patterns in, wait until you start including microorganisms: we have 10x as many bacteria in us as we have cells and the species variety is vast. (via phylogenomics on Twitter)
  4. Habits of Mathematical Minds — fantastic list of skills and approaches that are hallmarks of many successful minds, not just in mathematics. (via ddmeyer on Twitter)
Comments Off
Four short links: 3 Sep 2010

Four short links: 3 Sep 2010

Design Principles, Mario AI, Open Source Wave, and 3D Google Earth Sound

  1. Arranging Things: The Rhetoric of Object Placement (Amazon) — […] the underlying principles that govern how Western designers arrange things in three-dimensional compositions. Inspired by Greek and Roman notions of rhetoric […] Koren elucidates the elements of arranging rhetoric that all designers instinctively use in everything from floral compositions to interior decorating. (via Elaine Wherry)
  2. 2010 Mario AI Championship — three tracks: Gameplay, Learning, and Level Generation. Found via Ben Weber’s account of his Level Generation entry. My submission utilizes a multi-pass approach to level generation in which the system iterates through the level several times, placing different types of objects during each pass. During each pass through the level, a subset of each object type has a specific probability of being added to the level. The result is a computationally efficient approach to generating a large space of randomized levels.
  3. Wave in a Box — Google to flesh out existing open source Wave client and server into full “Wave in a Box” app status.
  4. 3D Sound in Google Earth (YouTube) — wow. (via Planet In Action)
Comments Off
In defense of games in the workplace

In defense of games in the workplace

"Gamestorming" author Dave Gray on how games cut through creative chaos.

Dave Gray, co-author of Gamestorming, contends that an embrace and understanding of game mechanics can yield benefits in many work environments, particularly those where old hierarchical models are no longer applicable. Gray discusses the collaborative power of games in the following Q&A.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 19 July 2010

Four short links: 19 July 2010

Open Source Brain Software, Mind Control, Data QA, Android Game Engine

  1. OpenVibe — open source software for brain-computer interfaces, from Inria.
  2. Robot Controlled by Mind (video) — uses OpenVibe. I love that this can see blinks and other neural activity, and that it’s hackable.
  3. Talend Open Profiler — open source tool to QA data.
  4. AndEngine — open source 2D OpenGL Game Engine for the Android platform.
Comments Off
Popular iPhone games stay highly-ranked only for a few weeks

Popular iPhone games stay highly-ranked only for a few weeks

With 40,000+ Games to choose from, the list of Top 100 free and paid games are frequently scanned by iPhone gamers. In this short post, I'll share some basic statistics on popular games sold through the U.S. iTunes app store.

Comments: 3
Four short links: 9 June 2010

Four short links: 9 June 2010

DIY Games, Code Review, Open Oil Data, Crowd Sourced Science Success

  1. Game Dev 101 lessons with WarioWare DIYNintendo’s long-running and (at its debut) groundbreaking WarioWare franchise has always been predicated on discrete games played for 5-10 seconds at a time, in rapid succession, and it’s precisely that stripped-bare approach that makes it an ideal launchpad for re-wiring the way aspiring designers think about what makes games fun. With its own bespoke image and music editor, a graphical scripting language not altogether (so I’m told) that different from the tools available in popular PC package GameMaker, and — crucially, if a bit over-long for those more familiar with game dev proper — hours worth of mandatory tutorials that leisurely stroll you through Your First Animated Sprite or Your First Logic Gate. (via BoingBoing)
  2. What Should Mozilla Look For In an Automated Review SystemMondrian’s review comment system really seemed to encourage a style where there was a one-way flow of instructions from the reviewer to the reviewee: “Do this. Do this. Do this.” and the reviewee replies with “Done. Done. Done.” Sometimes this is appropriate, but oftentimes it isn’t. (Mondrian is Google’s internal tool for this) (via Marc Hedlund)
  3. DOE Releases BP Oil Spill DataAs part of the Obama Administration’s ongoing commitment to transparency surrounding the response to the BP oil spill, the Department of Energy is providing online access to schematics, pressure tests, diagnostic results and other data about the malfunctioning blowout preventer. (via EllnMllr on Twitter)
  4. The Rise of Crowd Science — fascinating account of the life work of Alex Szalay, who has turned astronomy into a data-sharing discipline embracing crowdsourcing. I loved this story: More than 270,000 people have signed up to classify galaxies so far [on Galaxy Zoo]. One of them is Hanny van Arkel, a schoolteacher in Holland, who found out about the site after her favorite musician, Brian May, guitarist for the rock group Queen, wrote about it on his blog. After clicking around on Galaxy Zoo for a while one summer, she landed on an image with what she describes as a “very bright blue spot” on it. “I read the tutorial and there was nothing about a blue spot,” she says, so she posted a note to the site’s forums. “I was just really wondering, What is this?” Her curiosity paid off. Scientists now believe the spot is a highly unusual gas cloud that could help explain the life cycle of quasars. The Hubble telescope was recently pointed at the object, now nicknamed “Hanny’s Voorwerp,” the Dutch word for object. Astronomers have published papers about the discovery, listing Ms. van Arkel as a co-author. “Don’t ask me to explain them to you, but I am a co-author of them,” she says with a laugh. Szalay will be at Science Foo Camp this year, and I can’t wait to meet him. (via Penny Carnaby)
Comments Off

Ignite Show: Mehal Shah on Winning At Scrabble

Scrabble isn't a game of who can get the best 6 letter words. It's a game of points and squeezing 2 letter terms into corners. In this week's Ignite Show Mehal Shah takes us through clean and sometimes dirty ways to win at Scrabble. Some of his tips include: Thinking of Scrabble as a numbers game, instead of a…

Comment: 1