ENTRIES TAGGED "games"

Four short links: 7 November 2012

Four short links: 7 November 2012

Relativity Toys, Removing Metrics, Parallel Open Source, and Text Karaoke

  1. A Slower Speed of Light — game where you control the speed of light and discover the wonders of relativity. (via Andy Baio)
  2. Facebook Demetricator — removes all statistics and numbers from Facebook’s chrome (“37 people like this” becomes “people like this”). (via Beta Knowledge)
  3. Rx — Microsoft open sources their library for composing asynchronous and event-based programs using observable sequences and LINQ-style query operators.
  4. Typing Karaoke — this is awesome. Practice typing to song lyrics. With 8-bit aesthetic for maximum quirk.
Comment: 1
Four short links: 6 November 2012

Four short links: 6 November 2012

Internet of Copters, Privacy Game, Visualizing Data, Secure Configs

  1. Tilt-to-Fly Controller and Copter (Kickstarter) — This looks totally awesome and hackable. The controller has a USB port, the protocol is documented, and you can even connect your own electronics payload, like an Arduino, camera, or homebrewed project to the auxiliary serial (UART + power) port.
  2. The Privacy Game (The Open University) — This game is designed to highlight how privacy and consent work online. Players make decisions about which information they reveal, who they reveal it to and why. For example, you may decide to trade some information for gifts when shopping on a website; or you may decide to keep other information secret when posting on a social networking site. (via BoingBoing)
  3. statwing — very easy analysis and visualization of data.
  4. duraconfa collection of hardened configuration files for SSL/TLS services. It’s easy to reduce crypto effectiveness with crappy choices and options, so it’s good to have solid configurations to go from.
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Four short links: 24 October 2012

Four short links: 24 October 2012

Deblurring Images, Games Design, Secure Control, and Faster Emulation

  1. Restoration of Defocused and Blurry Images — impressive demos, and open source (GPLv3) code. All those blurred faces and documents no longer seem so safe.
  2. Peter Molyneux Profile in Wired — worth reading for: (a) Molyneux’s contribution to the genre; (b) the inspiration he drew from his satirical Twitter mirror (@PeterMolydeux) is lovely, and (c) the game jams to build the fake Molyneux games, where satire becomes reality. (via Andy Baio)
  3. Trusted Computing for Industrial Control Systems — Kaspersky reveals plans for an open source O/S for industrial control systems, so reactors and power stations and traffic systems aren’t vulnerable to StuxNet-type attacks. (via Jim Stogdill)
  4. Android Virtual Machines — faster emulation for testing than the traditional simulators.
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Four short links: 7 September 2012

Four short links: 7 September 2012

Collections, Games, Accessibility, and Science

  1. GS-Collections (GitHub) — Goldman Sachs open-sourced (Apache-licensed) their Java collection library, full of lambda goodness. No report on whether it requires a 750G bailout.
  2. Learning ZIL — old manual for the interactive fiction programming language that Zork and other Infocom games were written in. Virtual machines on a Z80 processor? They were hardcore before your time.
  3. NZ Government Web Toolkit — information and guides on accessibility standards.
  4. Workshop on Research and Resource Commons in Scientific Research: Final ReportThis diverse group discussed the current state of policy and technology as it relates to a scientific research commons, and identified key opportunities and challenges, as well as next steps, for the scientific community in general and Creative Commons in particular. Wilbanks describes as, “Sort of a wrapup after seven years of SC.” (via John Wilbanks)
Comment: 1
Four short links: 5 September 2012

Four short links: 5 September 2012

DIY Spectrometry, Mind-Controlled Drones, Javascript Games, and Open Source Font

  1. DIY Spectrometry KitThis open hardware kit costs only $35, but has a range of more than 400-900 nanometers, and a resolution of as high as 3 nm. A spectrometer is essentially a tool to measure the colors absorbed by a material. You can construct this one yourself from a piece of a DVD-R, black paper, a VHS box, and an HD USB webcam.
  2. Mind-Controlled Drones — Chinese demo of EEG to Bluetooth to laptop to wifi to UAV.
  3. Pac-Man in Javascript — in-browser loving recreation of a bunch of original Pac-Man games, with source on github. Cf this article on building Atari Arcade in CreateJS. (via Javascript Weekly)
  4. Source Sans — Adobe’s first open source typeface.
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Games for Health covers current status of behavior change

There have never been better reasons for doing right by ourselves

A few existing and upcoming projects that illustrate what games are doing in health care, and some trends to watch.

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Four short links: 19 April 2012

Four short links: 19 April 2012

Text Similarity, Designing Engagement, Clustering Stories, and Prince of Persia

  1. Superfastmatch — open source text comparison tool, used to locate plagiarism/churnalism in online news sites. You can pull out the text engine and use it for your own “find where this text is used elsewhere” applications (e.g., what’s being forwarded out in email, how much of this RFP is copy and paste, what’s NOT boilerplate in this contract, etc.). (via Pete Warden)
  2. Ten Design Principles for Engaging Math Tasks (Dan Meyer) — education gold, engagement gold, and some serious ideas you can use in your own apps.
  3. Clustering Related Stories (Jenny Finkel) — description of how to cluster related stories, talks about some of the tricks. Interesting without being too scary.
  4. Prince of Persia (GitHub) — I have waited to see if the novelty wore off, but I still find this cool: 1980s source code on GitHub.
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Four short links: 30 March 2012

Four short links: 30 March 2012

Font Games, Open Source Lessons, Kickstarter Insight, and Anonymous

  1. TypeConnection — a game that teaches you how to match fonts and why successful matches work. (via Sacha Judd)
  2. Lessons Learned Building Open Source Software (Mitchel Hashimoto) — the creator of Vagrant talks about the lesson he’s learned building a great open source project.
  3. Kickstarter Post-Mortem (Ze Frank) — excellent dig into the details of his campaign, what worked, what didn’t, and how he structured it.
  4. In Lulz We Trust (Gabriella Coleman) — her excellent Webstock talk about Anonymous.
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Developer Week in Review: The mysterious Google I/O machine

Developer Week in Review: The mysterious Google I/O machine

A Google I/O puzzler, more sandbox mayhem, and Go prepares to take wing.

While we wait to sign up for two of the major conferences of the year, Google has released a brainteaser, Java suffers another security breach, and a new language prepares for takeoff.

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Top Stories: March 12-16, 2012

Top Stories: March 12-16, 2012

The nuances of location language, game devs find funding through Kickstarter, and the state of ebook pricing.

This week on O'Reilly: Computational linguist Robert Munro explained why location language is far more complex than many realize, we looked at how Kickstarter's crowdfunding is helping game developers, and Joe Wikert explored the major trends shaping ebook prices.

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