ENTRIES TAGGED "geo"

Four short links: 5 December 2011

Four short links: 5 December 2011

Spatial Search, Exposing Your Phone's Perfidity, School Unconference, and Wikipedia Viz

  1. VP Trees — a data structure for fast spatial searching. A form of nearest neighbour, useful for melodies (PDF) and image retrieval (PDF) and poetry. (via Reddit)
  2. iYou — iTunes plugin to show you all the stuff your phone collects about you.
  3. Bar Camps in Primary Schools — NZ teacher deploys bar camps among students. Great things happen.
  4. Realtime Wikipedia Edits — fascinating and hypnotic and inspirational and appalling and irrelevant all at once.

Comment: 1 |
ePayments Week: Financial Times bets on its web app

ePayments Week: Financial Times bets on its web app

Financial Times goes all-in on its web app, Flickr puts up fences, and daily deal fatigue sets in.

The Financial Times says subscriber data trumps Apple's reach, Flickr introduces geofencing to keep things private, and the cracks in the daily deal world start to show.

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Snap to the graph, not the grid

Snap to the graph, not the grid

Location coordinate data lacks important context.

Coordinate pairs are regular and orderly, but they are entirely ambiguous when used to represent more conceptual places like states, cities, stores and neighborhoods.

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Four short links: 8 April 2011

Four short links: 8 April 2011

Varnish Guide, Fields Revealed, Dev Leaderboard, and Map Documentary

  1. A Practical Guide to Varnish — Varnish is the http accelerator used by the discerning devops.
  2. Ferrofluid Sculptures (New Scientist) — hypnotic video of an iron-based fluid that is moulded by magnetic fields, which I include for no good reason than it is pretty pretty science. (via Courtney Johnston)
  3. Twisted Highscores List — clever leaderboard for tickets, reviews, commits, and fixes. A fun retro presentation of the information, rather than a determined effort to jolly up the grim task of software development by spraying on a thin coat of gamejuice. (via Jacob Kaplan-Moss)
  4. Beauty of Maps (YouTube) — BBC’s “Beauty of Maps” tv show is available in full on YouTube. Aspects of visualization and design here, as well as practical cartography. (via Flowing Data)
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Four short links: 5 April 2011

Four short links: 5 April 2011

Big Maps, ssh VPN, Line Maps, and HTML5 Multiplayer Pacman

  1. The Big Map Blog — awesome old maps, for the afficionado. (via Sacha Judd)
  2. sshuttle — poor man’s VPN built over ssh. (via Hacker News)
  3. Remembering LineDrive — I, too, am bummed that LineDrive never became standard. And Maneesh, one of its cocreators. Check out his publications list!
  4. Websockets Pacman — multiplayer Pacman, where players take the role of ghosts. All implemented with WebSockets in HTML5. (via Pete Warden)
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Four short links: 16 December 2010

Four short links: 16 December 2010

Compressing Graphs, Authentication Usability, Extreme Design, and Rails Geo

  1. On Compressing Social Networks (PDF) — paper looking at the theory and practice of compressing social network graphs. Our main innovation here is to come up with a quick and useful method for generating an ordering on the social network nodes so that nodes with lots of common neighbors are near each other in the ordering, a property which is useful for compression (via My Biased Coin, via Matt Biddulph on Delicious)
  2. Requiring Email and Passwords for New Accounts (Instapaper blog) — a list of reasons why the simple signup method of “pick a username, passwords are optional” turned out to be trouble in the long run. (via Courtney Johnston’s Instapaper feed)
  3. Extreme Design — building the amazing spacelog.org in an equally-amazing fashion. I want a fort.
  4. rgeo — a new geo library for Rails. (via Daniel Azuma via Glen Barnes on Twitter)
Comment: 1 |
Four short links: 25 November 2010

Four short links: 25 November 2010

Twitter Mapped, Bibliographic Data Released, Babies Engadgeted, and Nat's Christmas Present Sorted

  1. A Day in the Life of Twitter (Chris McDowall) — all geo-tagged tweets from 24h of the Twitter firehose, displayed. Interesting things can be seen, such as Jakarta glowing as brightly as San Francisco. (via Chris’s sciblogs post)
  2. British Library Release 3M Open Bibliographic Records) (OKFN) — This dataset consists of the entire British National Bibliography, describing new books published in the UK since 1950; this represents about 20% of the total BL catalogue, and we are working to add further releases.
  3. Gadgets for Babies (NY Times) — cry decoders, algorithmically enhanced rocking chairs, and (my favourite) “voice-activated crib light with womb sounds”. I can’t wait until babies can make womb sound playlists and share them on Twitter.
  4. GP2X Caanoo MAME/Console Emulator (ThinkGeek) — perfect Christmas present for, well, me. Emulates classic arcade machines and microcomputers, including my nostalgia fetish object, the Commodore 64. (via BoingBoing’s Gift Guide)
Comment: 1 |
Four short links: 24 November 2010

Four short links: 24 November 2010

Android, Cellphone Photos, Long-Exposure iPhone Apps, and Open Street Map

  1. What Android Is (Tim Bray) — a good explanation of the different bits and their relationship.
  2. Cell Phone Photo Helped in Oil Spill (LA Times) — a lone scientist working from a cell phone photo who saved the day by convincing the government that a cap it considered removing was actually working as designed. (via BoingBoing)
  3. Penki — iPhone app that lets you paint 3D messages which are revealed in long-exposure photographs. (via Aaron Straup Cope on Delicious)
  4. I’m Working at Microsoft and We’re Donating Imagery to OpenStreetMap! (Steve Coast) — MSFT hired the creator of OSM and he says Microsoft is donating access to its global orthorectified aerial imagery to help OpenStreetMappers make the map even better than it already is.
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Four short links: 23 November 2010

Four short links: 23 November 2010

AppEngine Gripes, LIDAR Hacking, Web Stripping, and Map Storytelling

  1. Goodbye App Engine — clear explanation of the reasons why Google AppEngine isn’t the right thing to build your startup on. Don’t read the comments unless you want to lose faith in humanity. (via Michael Koziarski on Twitter)
  2. Neato Robotics XV-11 Tear-down — the start of hackable LIDAR, which would enable cheap and easy 3D mapping, via a Roomba-like robovacuum with a LIDAR module in it. (via Chris Anderson on Twitter)
  3. Boilerpipe — code to remove boilerplate wrappers from a webpage, returning just the text you care about. (via Andy Baio)
  4. Visual Eyes web-based authoring tool developed at the University of Virginia to weave images, maps, charts, video and data into highly interactive and compelling dynamic visualizations. (via Courtney Johnston’s Instapaper feed)
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Where the semantic web stumbled, linked data will succeed

Where the semantic web stumbled, linked data will succeed

Linked data allows for deep and serendipitous consumer experiences.

Linked data can be realized without the purity of semantic annotation, but a focus on consumers gives it a better shot at adoption. It begs the question: Why invest in difficult technologies if consumer outcomes can be realized with current tools and knowledge?

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