ENTRIES TAGGED "git"

Inside GitHub’s role in community-building and other open source advances

Inside GitHub’s role in community-building and other open source advances

An interview with Matthew McCullough

In this video interview, Matthew McCullough of GitHub discusses what they’ve learned over time as they grow and watch projects develop there. (more…)
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Jon Loeliger offers some practices to use with Git

Jon Loeliger offers some practices to use with Git

Advice from author of "Version Control with Git."

After finishing the second edition of "Version Control with Git," author Jon Loeliger talked to O'Reilly editor Andy Oram about how to use Git effectively as changes to code pile up.

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Developer Week in Review: Google I/O's ticket window opens and shuts in record time

Developer Week in Review: Google I/O's ticket window opens and shuts in record time

Google I/O reg disappoints many, Microsoft shares, and happy birthday to gcc.

Google I/O registration was there and gone so fast you might have missed it if you blinked, Microsoft is sharing more of its code Apache-style, and the leading compiler package in the world celebrates a milestone.

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Developer Week in Review: Mobile's embedded irony

Developer Week in Review: Mobile's embedded irony

Who really profits from Android sales? And does the world need another source control system?

Microsoft profits from Google's toils, why you shouldn't put older developers out to pasture, and a new source control system enters the fray.

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Four short links: 4 July 2011

Four short links: 4 July 2011

God Games, Digitised History, git Database, and App Framework

  1. Let There Be Smite (Pippin Barr) — simple diversion for the 4th of July. It won’t be easy for God to save America. (via Pippin’s blog)
  2. Basel Wear — to answer the question I know was burning on your lips: “what *did* the Swiss wear in 1634?” Impressively detailed pictures from a 1634 book that is now online. One of the reasons I’m in favour of digitizing cultural collections is that we’re more likely to encounter them on the net and so ask questions like “how did people dress in 1634?”, “why did everyone carry keys?”, and “what is a Sexton?”
  3. databranches: Using git as a Database it’s important to approach your design for using git as a database from the perspective of automated merging. Get the merging right and the rest will follow. I’ve chosen to use the simplest possible merge, the union merge: When merging parent trees A and B, the result will have all files that are in either A or B, and files present in both will have their lines merged (and possibly reordered or uniqed).
  4. Joshfire — open source (dual-licensed GPLv2 and commercial) multiplatform development framework built on HTML5.
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Four short links: 21 April 2011

Four short links: 21 April 2011

Regular Expressions, Mac Git, Open Source Patents, and Pepys Lessons

  1. Rubular — a way to write and test regular expressions interactively. Very cool. (via Adam Fields)
  2. gitx — OSX ui for git. (via Marc Hedlund)
  3. Open Source Critical to Competition (Simon Phipps) — DOJ and German Federal Cartel Office see danger for open source in Novell’s patents being acquired by a consortium of Oracle, Microsoft, Apple, and EMC (fancy!) and are taking steps to ensure open source is protected.
  4. My Talk about Samuel Pepys’s Diary as an Online Story (Phil Gyford) — I love the ways Phil has stretched and repurposed the web’s affects for storytelling. Listen to this talk. (via BoingBoing)
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Developer Week in Review

Developer Week in Review

App Store policy makes developers see red, Ubuntu may have a black heart, and a look at the blue content in git commits.

Coming up on the Week in Review: Revolt of the App Store developers, Ubuntu's innocence lost, and a report we swear you'll like.

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Four short links: 7 February 2011

Four short links: 7 February 2011

Printed Toys, Magazines in JS, git push web, Clean Beats More

  1. UK Internet Entrepreneurs (Guardian) — two things stood out for me. (1) A startup focused on 3d printing better dolls for boys and girls. (2) it seems easier to the government to start something new and impose its own vision than it is to understand and integrate with what already exists.
  2. TreeSaver.js — MIT/GPLv2-licensed JavaScript framework for creating magazine-style layouts using standards-compliant HTML and CSS.
  3. Using git to Manage a Web SiteThis page describes how I set things up so that I can make changes live by running just “git push web”.
  4. Strata Data Conference RecapClean data > More Data > Fancy Math — this is the order which makes data easier and better to work with. Clean data will be easier to work with and provide best results. If your data isn’t clean, it is better to have more data than having to resort to fancy math. Using higher order statistical processing, while workable as a last resort, will require longer to develop, difficult algorithms and harder to maintain. So best place to focus is to start with clean data.
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Four Short Links: 2 February 2011

Four Short Links: 2 February 2011

Visualization Papers, Immersive Learning, Readability, and Quora's Technology

  1. Seven Foundational Visualization Papers — seven classics in the field that are cited and useful again and again.
  2. Git Immersion — a “walking tour” of Git inspired by the premise that to know a thing is to do it. Cf Learn Python the Hard Way or even NASA’s Planet Makeover. We’ll see more and more tutorials that require participation because you don’t get muscle memory by reading. (NASA link via BoingBoing
  3. Readability — strips out ads and sends money to the publishers you like. I’d never thought of a business model as something that’s imposed from the outside quite like this, but there you go.
  4. Quora’s Technology Examined (Phil Whelan) — In this blog post I will delve into the snippets of information available on Quora and look at Quora from a technical perspective. What technical decisions have they made? What does their architecture look like? What languages and frameworks do they use? How do they make that search bar respond so quickly? Lots of Python. (via Joshua Schachter on Delicious)
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Four short links: 30 November 2010

Four short links: 30 November 2010

Git Library, Uncocked Open Data, Role of Editorial, and Network Neutrality Salvo

  1. libgit2 — a linkable git library. Ruby and Python bindings.
  2. Open Data: How Not to Cock It Up — Tom Steinberg lays it out.
  3. Algorithm and Crowd are Not EnoughMy point isn’t that Google, Netflix, Amazon, Yelp or any of the others are doomed. But I do think there’s an opportunity brewing for entrepreneurs, websites and companies to add editorial components to the algo-crowd paradigm. O’Reilly’s business is built on editorial value, whether in book selection or conference creation. We obviously see a continued role for editorial presence. (via John Battelle on Twitter)
  4. Level 3 vs Comcast (Denver Post) — first shakedown from the carriers. Without mandated neutral carriers, the Internet will dissolve into a fiefdom of consolidated big players willing to pay the shakedowns of the telco goons.
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