ENTRIES TAGGED "google app engine"

Four short links: 14 June 2014

Four short links: 14 June 2014

UK Gov 2.0, Remote Work, Git + App Engine, and Amazon Sells 3D Printer Goodies

  1. How Geeks Opened up the UK Government (Guardian) — excellent video introduction to how the UK is transforming its civil service to digital delivery. Most powerful moment for me was scrolling through various depts’ web sites and seeing consistent visual design.
  2. Tools for Working Remotely — Braid’s set of tools (Trello, Hackpad, Slingshot, etc.) for remote software teams.
  3. Git Push to Deploy on Google App EngineEnabling this feature will create a remote Git repository for your application’s source code. Pushing your application’s source code to this repository will simultaneously archive the latest the version of the code and deploy it to the App Engine platform.
  4. Amazon’s 3D Printer Store — printers and supplies. Deeply underwhelming moment of it arriving on the mainstream.
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Four short links: 29 December 2010

Four short links: 29 December 2010

GAE Datastore, Datamining Books, Processing Word Clouds, and URL Design

  1. datastore — implementation of Google App Engine Datastore in Java, running on hbase and hadoop. (via Hacker News)
  2. Mining of Massive Datasets — 340 page book from Stanford with the best copyright cautionary coverletter: we expect that you will acknowledge our authorship if you republish parts or all of it. We are sorry to have to mention this point, but we have evidence that other items we have published on the Web have been appropriated and republished under other names. It is easy to detect such misuse, by the way, as you will learn in Chapter 3. (via Delicious)
  3. Wordcram — generate word clouds in Processing. (via jandot on Twitter)
  4. URL Design — the why and how of designing your URLs. Must-read. (via kneath on Twitter)
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Four short links: 7 September 2009

Four short links: 7 September 2009

XMPP, Future of Web Frameworks, Infrastructure Stories, Better Email Client

  1. App Engine Now Supports XMPP (Jabber) — messaging servers, whether XMPP or PubSubHubBub, are becoming an increasingly important way to loosely join the small pieces. Google’s incorporation of XMPP into GAE reflects this (and the fact that Wave is built on XMPP). (via StPeter on Twitter)
  2. Snakes on the Web (Jacob Kaplan-Moss) — The best way to predict the future of web development, I think, is to keep asking ourselves the question that led to all the past advances: what sucks, and how can we fix it? So: what sucks about web development? An excellent and thought-provoking talk about the possible directions for improvement in web framework design.
  3. Ravelry (Tim Bray) — We’ve got 430,000 registered users, in a month we’ll see 200,000 of those, about 135,000 in a week and about 70,000 in a day. We peak at 3.6 million pageviews per day. That’s registered users only (doesn’t include the very few pages that are Google accessible) and does not include the usual API calls, RSS feeds, AJAX. [...] We have 7 servers running Gentoo Linux and virtualized into a total of 13 virtual servers with Xen. [...]“. Interesting technical and business discussion with an unexpected busy site.
  4. So’s Your Facet: Faceted Global Search for Mozilla Thunderbird — email clients are LONG overdue for improvement. Encouraging to see an active and open research project to improve it from the folks at Mozilla Messaging.
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Four short links: 9 July 2009

Four short links: 9 July 2009

  1. Ten Rules That Govern Groups — valuable lessons for all who would create or use social software, each backed up with pointers to the social science study about that lesson. Groups breed competition: While co-operation within group members is generally not so much of a problem, co-operation between groups can be hellish. People may be individually co-operative, but once put in a ‘them-and-us’ situation, rapidly become remarkably adversarial. (via Mind Hacks)
  2. Yahoo! TrafficServer Proposal — Yahoo! want to open source their TrafficServer product, an HTTP/1.1 caching proxy server. Alpha geeks who worked with it are excited at the prospect. It has a plugin architecture that means it can cache NNTP, RTSP, and other non-HTTP protocols.
  3. App Engine ConclusionsI’ve reluctantly concluded that I don’t like it. I want to like it, since it’s a great poster child for Python. And there are some bright spots, like the dirt-simple integration with google accounts. But it’s so very very primitive in so many ways. Not just the missing features, or the “you can use any web framework you like, as long as it’s django” attitude, but primarily a lot of the existing API is just so very primitive.
  4. Microsoft HohmSign up with Hohm and we’ll provide you with a home energy report and energy-saving recommendations tailored to your home. Wesabe for power at the moment, with interesting possibilities ahead should Microsoft partner with smartmetering utility companies the way Google Powermeter does. This is notable because this is a web app launched by Microsoft, with no connection to Windows or other Microsoft properties beyond requiring a “Live ID” to login. For commentary, see Microsoft Hohm Gets Green Light for Launch and PC Mag. (via Freaklabs)
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Four short links: 8 July 2009

Four short links: 8 July 2009

  1. Stop Whining About Facebook’s Redesign (Slate) — How can I be so sure that you’ll learn to like the redesign? Because you did the last two times Facebook did it. The conclusion is that sites don’t say why they’re redesigning, and that causes the resistance.
  2. C# and CLI under the Community Promise (Miguel de Icaza) — Microsoft have announced they won’t pursue patents relating to C# or the .NET Common Language Infrastructure (CLI): It is important to note that, under the Community Promise, anyone can freely implement these specifications with their technology, code, and solutions. You do not need to sign a license agreement, or otherwise communicate to Microsoft how you will implement the specifications. Good news for Mono and other .NET-compatible projects.
  3. app-engine-patch — a patch that lets most of Django work on Google App Engine. (via caseywest on Twitter)
  4. Scope — talk by Matt Webb, given to Reboot 2009. Every ten slides I sigh happily as new mental connections slide into place, as only Matt can make them. Worth it just for finding this Stewart Brand quote, “We are as gods and might as well get good at it.” That one sentence could direct a lifetime of action.
Comments: 3
Google App Engine Lets Your Web App Grow Up

Google App Engine Lets Your Web App Grow Up

Google released App Engine less than a year ago. It was the first chance for external developers to use the power of Google's servers. The powerful platform supported Python and was free (within limits). It now supports 45,000 apps and those apps get over 100 million page views per day. Those pageviews were all free, but they had limits. That's going to change. After today developers can pay to have more storage, more bandwidth, more CPU time and send more email.

Comments: 21

Service Monitoring Dashboards are mandatory for production services!

Google App Engine went down earlier today. GAE is still a developer preview release, and currently lacks a public monitoring dashboard. Unfortunately this means that many people either found out from their app and/or admin consoles being unavailable or from Mike Arrington's post on TechCrunch. Google has a strong Web Operations culture, and there are numerous internal monitoring tools in…

Comments: 6