ENTRIES TAGGED "Guardian"

Four short links: 20 August 2010

Four short links: 20 August 2010

Case Study, Promise Transparency, Scriptable Browsing, Open Science Data Success

  1. Case Study: Slideshare Goes Freemium (Startup Lessons Learned) — I love case studies, they’re the best part of every business degree. The MVPs were tricky to implement for emotional reasons, too. Because the SlideShare team was used to giving away a high-value product, engineers balked at charging for a clearly imperfect product. The analytics package, for instance, launched in what Sinha calls “a very crude version; we started off and sold it before we were comfortable with it.”
  2. Guardian’s Pledge Tracker — keeping track of the pledges and promises from the new UK government. (via niemanlab)
  3. luakit browser framework — script WebKit using Lua. (via ivanristic)
  4. Sharing of Data Leads to Progress on Alzheimers (New York Times) — The key to the Alzheimer’s project was an agreement as ambitious as its goal: not just to raise money, not just to do research on a vast scale, but also to share all the data, making every single finding public immediately, available to anyone with a computer anywhere in the world. No one would own the data. No one could submit patent applications, though private companies would ultimately profit from any drugs or imaging tests developed as a result of the effort.
Comments Off |
Four short links: 28 May 2010

Four short links: 28 May 2010

Understanding a Shuffle, Bias, Open Source a Success in Malaysia, and Guardian APIs

  1. The Intuition Behind the Fisher-Yates Shuffle — this is a simple algorithm to randomize a list of things, but most people are initially puzzled that it is more efficient than a naive shuffling algorithm. This is a nice explanation of the logic behind it.
  2. Wikipedia and Inherent Open Source Bias — a specific case of what I think of as the Firefly Principle: what happens on the Internet isn’t representative of real life.
  3. Malaysian Public Sector Open Source Program — the Malaysian government is a heavy and successful user of open source.
  4. Guardian’s Platform Now Open for Business (GigaOm) — elegant summary breakdown of services from the Guardian: metadata for free, content if you pay, custom APIs and applications if you pay more. I’m interested to see how well this works, given that the newspaper business is struggling to find a business model that values content.
Comments Off |