ENTRIES TAGGED "javascript"

A concrete approach to learning how to program

A solid foundation on which more meaningful learning can happen

578px-Perspectiva-1.svgAs someone who has previously taught computer programming for nearly a decade, I’m often asked questions that involve “what’s the best way to go about learning to program computers,” or “what’s the best way to get a software engineering job,” or “how can I learn to build mobile or web apps?”

Most of the readers of this blog have probably faced the same question at some point in their career. How did you answer it? I’ve seen many different responses: “come up with an idea for an app and build it,” or “get a computer science degree,” or “go read The Little Schemer,” or “join an open-source project that excites you,” or “learn Ruby on Rails.”

The interesting thing about these responses is that, for the most part, they can be classified into one of two categories: top-down approaches or bottom-up approaches. Top-down approaches are informed by the opinion that it’s better to be thrown in the middle of an application or a framework which encourages the learner to piece together knowledge in that context. Many books and online tutorials use an explicit top-down approach, often starting with the basics of a popular methodology, framework or technology. The most visible example of this are books on Ruby on Rails — they almost always inevitably begin with a description of the Model-View-Controller design pattern, but defer the incredible number of non-obvious ideas that make it up (Object-Oriented Programming, for instance).

On the other hand, a bottom-up approach starts with the basics/fundamentals of programming and then slowly builds your knowledge over time. In contrast to top-down approaches, bottom-up approaches try to minimize the number of these non-obvious ideas that the learner has to take for granted. Khan Academy and Code Academy are two examples of online sites that use a bottom-up approach to teaching programming. For the most part, they completely leave out any specific framework and focus on fundamentals of programming.

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Understand the four layers of JavaScript OOP in one short lesson

6 highlights from Axel Rauschmayer's webcast

Last week Axel Rauschmayer presented “The Four Layers of JavaScript OOP.” His approach to teaching JavaScript OOP is doing so incrementally, through layers. Each of the four layers builds upon the last. The lesson runs just under an hour.

  • The live audience (1,500 attendees) brought certain foreknowledge to the course, represented by this graph (based on a live poll). Most individuals had knowledge of object oriented programming, whether with JavaScript or another language, and fewest had knowledge of prototype chains.  [at 01:30]
  • Axel walked through an overview of the 4 layers of JavaScript OOP and summarized each. [at 2:25]
  • Layer 1, Single object. [at 3:55]
  • Layer 2, Prototype chain. [at 14:52]

Layers 1 and 2 together form a simple core, which you can refer back to if confusion sets in. This way you can re-ground yourself at any point in the foundations of the course.

  • Layer 3, Constructor. [at 22:02]
  • Layer 4, Constructor Inheritance. [at 32:42]

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Javascript without the this

Using closures in a different way

One of JavaScript’s many wrinkles is the way that this works. It can be quite confusing, since the semantics are quite different from the purely lexical scoping rules which apply for regular variables in JavaScript. What this references can often be totally unrelated to the lexical scope of a function. To work around that we often see tricks like:

Anyone who’s done much JavaScript development has felt this pain. Imagine if that was never needed. How could we get there? Well, one way would be to just never use this. Sounds crazy? Let’s see.

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How to (semi-)automate JavaScript refactoring

Disposable robot assassins and spreadsheets

Computers aren’t ready to write much of our code for us, but they can still help us clean and improve our code.

At Fluent 2013, O’Reilly’s Web Platform, JavaScript and HTML5 conference, Giles Bowkett demonstrated a wide variety of ways to write code that helps refactor code, showing developers a variety of ways to clean up and simplify their JavaScript. He gave ‘disposable robot assassin at large’ as his title, but it fit better with the code he was demonstrating.

Bowkett explored many options and iterations of his automation ideas,

  • The roots: Martin Fowler’s classic Refactoring. [at 00:50]
  • “Probably the first time ever you see a developer or hacker enthusiastic about using a spreadsheet… I am that fluke.” [at 01:48]
  • Matching method names with the ack and wc Unix command line utilities, and finding some useless methods. [at 5:58]
  • “More complex information… surfacing an implicit object model.” [at 7:45]
  • Filter scripts and text streams [at 14:45]
  • “Towlie, because it liked to make things DRY”, using similarity detection in Ruby. [at 16:37]
  • Building on JSLint [at 20:10]
  • Switching to a Ruby parser for JavaScript to calculate differences [at 21:49]
  • JavaScript parsers: Esprima [at 27:26]
  • “Have script that… tells you this file is the one that people have edited most frequently. [at 30:29]
  • Grepping through git history [at 32:53]
  • “Automatic refactoring will let you get to better code much faster.” [at 36:25]

It’s an amazing mix of capabilities that let you build your own robot (code) assassins.

If the Web Platform, JavaScript, and HTML5 interest you, consider checking out our growing collection of top-rated talks from Fluent 2013.

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An introduction to TypeScript

At Fluent 2013, O’Reilly’s conference dedicated to the Web Platform, JavaScript and HTML5, Microsoft’s Luke Hoban spoke about TypeScript, a strict superset of JavaScript that adds optional static typing, modules, and classes.

In Introduction to TypeScript, Luke presented a 40 minute introduction to the language, how it relates to JavaScript and ECMAScript 6, and how TypeScript looks and behaves in IDE environments and within the context of complete applications.

TypeScript is an open source project from Microsoft that aims to help developers work on larger applications that could benefit from features like static typing but without eschewing JavaScript and its wealth of libraries and tools. As TypeScript is a strict superset of JavaScript, all JavaScript code is legitimate TypeScript code and TypeScript compiles down to idiomatic JavaScript so it runs on any runtime that JavaScript does too.

Some key parts of Todd’s talk include:

  • What is TypeScript? [at 01:48]
  • A demo of TypeScript [at 05:14]
  • A look at how typing helps [at 06:40]
  • How classes in TypeScript work [at 16:20]
  • The TypeScript ecosystem / community [at 21:53]
  • TypeScript 0.9 [at 25:48]
  • A look at generics support [at 29:18]
  • TypeScript in the context of a full app [at 34:40]

If you want to learn more about TypeScript, check out the official TypeScript homepage which includes a simple tutorial and an interactive playground that lets you type TypeScript code on the left hand side of the screen and see the JavaScript translation on the right.

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Four short links: 11 February 2014

Four short links: 11 February 2014

Shadow Banking, Visualization Thoughts, Streaming Video Data, and Javascript Puzzlers

  1. China’s $122BB Boom in Shadow Banking is Happening on Phones (Quartz) — Tencent’s recently launched online money market fund (MMF), Licai Tong, drew in 10 billion yuan ($1.7 billion) in just six days in the last week of January.
  2. The Weight of Rain — lovely talk about the thought processes behind coming up with a truly insightful visualisation.
  3. Data on Video Streaming Starting to Emerge (Giga Om) — M-Lab, which gathers broadband performance data and distributes that data to the FCC, has uncovered significant slowdowns in throughput on Comcast, Time Warner Cable and AT&T. Such slowdowns could be indicative of deliberate actions taken at interconnection points by ISPs.
  4. Javascript Puzzlers — how well do you know Javascript?
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Four short links: 5 February 2014

Four short links: 5 February 2014

Graph Drawing, DARPA Open Source, Quantified Vehicle, and IoT Growth

  1. sigma.js — Javascript graph-drawing library (node-edge graphs, not charts).
  2. DARPA Open Catalog — all the open source published by DARPA. Sweet!
  3. Quantified Vehicle Meetup — Boston meetup around intelligent automotive tech including on-board diagnostics, protocols, APIs, analytics, telematics, apps, software and devices.
  4. AT&T See Future In Industrial Internet — partnering with GE, M2M-related customers increased by more than 38% last year. (via Jim Stogdill)
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Building rich web UIs with knockout.js

Live coding a shopping cart and other rich web UI goodness

At Fluent 2013, O’Reilly’s Web Platform, JavaScript and HTML5 conference, Microsoft’s Steve Sanderson gave a tight 20 minute introductory tour of Knockout.js, a popular JavaScript UI library built around declarative bindings and the Model-View ViewModel (MVVM) pattern.

In his talk, Rich Web UIs with Knockout.js, Steve quickly summarized the problems Knockout solves and why Knockout is a particularly strong candidate to solve those problems, before working on a shopping cart example to show off how bindings, including custom bindings, work within Knockout.

Some key parts of Todd’s talk include:

  • A description of the problem Knockout solves [at 00:41]
  • What is Knockout and MVVM? [at 01:38]
  • 4 unique things about Knockout [at 03:12]
  • Live coding a shopping cart [at 06:02]
  • Summary [at 20:15]

Anyone with a further interest in Knockout should check out the project’s homepage and particularly the live Hello World example and interactive online tutorial which guides you through building a Web UI using the MVVM pattern with Knockout.js in an interactive sandbox-style environment.

If the Web Platform, JavaScript, and HTML5 interest you, consider checking out our growing collection of top-rated talks from Fluent 2013.

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Web application development is different (and better)

On both front and back end, the Web challenges conventional wisdom

The Web became the most ubiquitous distributed application system because it didn’t have to think of itself as a programming environment. Almost every day I see comments or complaints from programmers (even brilliant programmers) muttering about how many strange and inferior parts they have to deal with, how they’d like to fix a historical accident by ripping out HTML completely and replacing it with Canvas, and how separation of concerns is an inconvenience. Everything should be JavaScript.

(Apologies to Tom Dale, who tweeted a perfect series of counterpoints just as I was writing. He has visions of rebuilding the rendering stack in JavaScript, but those tweets are not unusual opinions.)

The Web is different, and I can see why programmers might have little tolerance for the paths it chose, but this time the programmers are wrong. It’s not that the Web is perfect – it certainly has glitches. It’s not that success means something is better. Many terrible things have found broad audiences, and there are infinite levels to the Worse is Better conversations. And of course, the Web doesn’t solve every programming need. Many problems just don’t fit, and that’s fine.

So why is the Web better?

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What I use for data visualization

Depending on the nature of the problem, data size, and deliverable, I still draw upon an array of tools for data visualization. As I survey the Design track at next month’s Strata conference, I see creators and power users of visualization tools that many data scientists have come to rely on. Several pioneers will lead sessions on (new) tools for creating static and interactive charts, against small and massive data sets.

The Grammar of Graphics
To this day, I find R (specifically ggplot2) to be a tool I turn to for producing static visualizations. Even the simplest charts allow me to quickly spot data problems and anomalies, and a tool like ggplot2 can accomplish a lot in very few lines of code. Charts produced by ggplot2 look much nicer than simple R plots and once you get past the initial learning curve, they are easy to fine-tune and customize.

Hadley Wickham1, the creator of ggplot2, is speaking on two new domain specific languages (ggvis and dplyr) that make it easy for R users to declaratively create interactive web graphics. As Hadley describes it, ggvis is interactive Grammar of Graphics for R. As more data scientists turn to interactive visualizations that can be shared through web browsers, ggvis is the natural next tool for ggplot2 users.

Leland Wilkinson, the primary author of The Grammar of Graphics2, will also be at Strata to lead a tutorial on an interesting expert system that lets machine-learning techniques be accessible to business users. Leland’s work has influenced many other visualization tools including Polaris (from the Stanford team that founded Tableau), Bokeh, and ggbio (for genomics data). Effective visualization techniques will be an important component of his Strata tutorial.

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