ENTRIES TAGGED "journalism"

Six ways data journalism is making sense of the world, around the world

Early responses from our investigation into data-driven journalism had an international flavor.

When I wrote that Radar was investigating data journalism and asked for your favorite examples of good work, we heard back from around the world.

I received emails from Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Canada and Italy that featured data visualization, explored the role of data in government accountability, and shared how open data can revolutionize environmental reporting. A tweet pointed me to a talk about how R is being used in the newsroom. Another tweet linked to relevant interviews on social science and the media:

Two of the case studies focused on data visualization, an important practice that my colleague Julie Steele and other editors at O’Reilly Media have been exploring over the past several years.

Several other responses are featured at more length below. After you read through, make sure to also check out this terrific Ignite talk on data journalism recorded at this year’s Newsfoo in Arizona. Read more…

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Four short links: 8 November 2012

Four short links: 8 November 2012

Local Competitive Intelligence, Journalism Doesn't Scale, Winning With Big Data, Predicting the Future

  1. Closely — new startup by Perry Evans (founder of MapQuest), giving businesses a simple app to track competitors’ online deals and social media activity. Seems a genius move to me: so many businesses flounder online, “I don’t know what to do!”, so giving them a birds-eye view of their competition turns the problem into “do better than them!”.
  2. The FT in Play (Reuters) — very interesting point in this analysis of the Financial Times being up for sale: [Traditional] journalism doesn’t have economies of scale. The bigger that journalistic organizations become, the less efficient they get. (via Bernard Hickey)
  3. Big Data Behind Obama’s Win (Time) — huge analytics operation, very secretive, providing insights and updates on everything.
  4. How to Predict the FutureThis is the story of a spreadsheet I’ve been keeping for almost twenty years. Thesis: hardware trends more useful for predicting advances than software trends. (via Kenton Kivestu)
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Four short links: 21 March 2012

Four short links: 21 March 2012

Data Journalism, Fast Web Servers, Android App Inventor, and Daily Deal Dirt

  1. S0rce — gorgeous infographics. They purport to let you Think for Yourself which is bald-faced bullshit: the choice of which data to present, and the invisible collection and curation practices behind the data, is the choice of what story to tell and what it will say. That said, it’s wonderful to see the numbers (and they are attributed) behind the Republican Primary and Copyright and Piracy Legislation.
  2. Modern HTTP Servers are Fast — I remember when the best web engineering in the world would still fall over if a box got more than 10 hits/second. Yes, yes, I’m writing this on my grandpa box. Check out the hardware specs of the box these numbers are from.
  3. MIT App Inventor — web-based app designer. Does not appear to be open source. There is no long-term sustainability for this kind of development environment: when MIT decide “nah screw it, not going to run this any more” or “hmm, maybe we’ll charge for it”, you’re boned–you can download the “source” to your app in a zip file but AppInventor is the only dev environment which can consume it. I hope it’ll become the awesome and easy dev environment that Android needs, but I hope they prevent it from being a dead end.
  4. Daily Deals: Prediction, Social Diffusion, and Reputational Ramificationswe consider the effects of daily deals on the longer-term reputation of merchants, based on their Yelp reviews before and after they run a daily deal. Our analysis shows that while the number of reviews increases significantly due to daily deals, average rating scores from reviewers who mention daily deals are 10% lower than scores of their peers on average. (via Greg Linden)
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Top Stories: December 12-16, 2011

Top Stories: December 12-16, 2011

Five data predictions for 2012, a Kindle Single and long-form journalism, and the frustrations of the mobile experience.

This week on O'Reilly: Edd Dumbill offered five big data predictions for the year to come, Marc Herman discussed his new Kindle Single and how that platform could help long-form journalism, and Joshua Bixby examined mobile frustrations and expectations.

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Publishing News: One publishing experiment ends, another begins

Publishing News: One publishing experiment ends, another begins

Seth Godin ends The Domino Project, Marc Herman blazes a journalism trail, and authors get personal on tour.

The Domino Project published its final book. Elsewhere, Marc Herman took his long-form journalism straight to a Kindle Single and the WSJ looked at the changing roles of authors on book tours.

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How I automated my writing career

How I automated my writing career

A former author uses data and software to take the tedium out of some kinds of writing.

You scale content businesses by increasing the number of people who create the content … or so conventional wisdom says. Learn how a former author is using software to simulate and expand human-quality writing.

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The work of data journalism: Find, clean, analyze, create … repeat

The work of data journalism: Find, clean, analyze, create … repeat

Simon Rogers on the effort behind data journalism.

Great journalism does not magically spring from spreadsheets. In this interview, Simon Rogers discusses the grunt work and tools behind The Guardian's data stories.

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Harvard's Berkman Center hosts star-studded forum on media and the "vast wasteland"

May 9, 1961 marked the first public appearance of Newt Minow as FCC
chairman, where he achieved immortality by raising the claim that
television was a "vast wasteland." The phrase entered American life so
thoroughly that citing it has become almost reflexive in media
commentary over the intervening fifty years. Last night, the Berkman
Center held a gala event re-examining media, and the main guest of
honor was…Newt Minow!

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Four short links: 5 September 2011

Four short links: 5 September 2011

Bitcoin Banks, Journo Ethics, Android and iOS, and Clever Algorithms

  1. Dan Kaminsky on Bitcoin (Slideshare) — short version: banks are an emergent property as it scales.
  2. Unethical Ventures (All Things D) — astonishing slam on the new venture fund that Michael Arrington (founder of TechCrunch) will be running while still writing for TechCrunch. This could have been a lot cleaner, of course, by Arrington simply resigning from TechCrunch, becoming a VC and perhaps starting a new blog where his agenda is much clearer, from which he could huff and puff away as he does with much entertaining gusto at real and (mostly) imagined slights. There is certainly precedent for VCs blogging, including Fred Wilson, Brad Feld and Ben Horowitz. And, despite my criticisms about ethics, it is clear that Arrington is a talented writer whose unique voice would be even stronger if it was truly seen as separate from what has become a news organization. But because of his obvious need to be the center of attention — requiring the ermine kingmaker mantle and foisting his patented I’m-here-to-tell-it-like-it-is attitude on us all — that appears to be impossible.
  3. An iOS Developer Takes on Android — a very easy to follow comparison of the two platforms from a developer who worked on both and who is carefully not partisan. I hadn’t realized before what an advantage OpenGL confers to the iOS devices. It’s not just for 3D games any more (he says, catching up with 2008).
  4. Clever Algorithms — book of 45 nature-inspired algorithms, code in Ruby.
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Four short links: 1 September 2011

Four short links: 1 September 2011

Android Charting, Illusion of Insight, Mapping API, and Science Storytelling

  1. A Chart Engine — Android charting engine.
  2. The Illusion of Asymmetric Insight — we are driven to create and form groups and then believe others are wrong just because they are others.
  3. Urban Mapping API — add rich geographic data to web and non-web applications.
  4. Tell Us A Story, Victoria — a university science story-telling contest.
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