ENTRIES TAGGED "language"

Checking in on Python

Guido Van Rossum on the state of Python and the two services that are helping to push it forward.

Guido van Rossum is the creator of Python. I recently had the opportunity to talk with him about the state of the language. You probably don’t realize it, but Python’s capabilities are pushed every time you use YouTube and Dropbox. During our interview, Van Rossum said both of these services are at the forefront of Python’s development. “Whenever…
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Clojure's advantage: Immediate feedback with REPL

Clojure's advantage: Immediate feedback with REPL

Chas Emerick on how Clojure can make a difference to developers.

REPL is built into Clojure, and you can connect to any running Clojure process and modify and execute code. In this interview, "Clojure Programming" co-author Chas Emerick discusses the possibilities this introduces for Clojure developers.

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Visualization of the Week: Anachronistic language in "Mad Men"

Visualization of the Week: Anachronistic language in "Mad Men"

A look at the historical accuracy of "Mad Men's" dialogue.

"Mad Men" is praised for its precise attention to historical visuals, but how does its dialogue stack up against text from the 1960s? Ben Schmidt's new visualization explores that question.

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Four short links: 23 March 2012

Four short links: 23 March 2012

Caching Pages, Node NLP, Digital Native are Clueless, and Wal-Mart Loves Your Calendar

  1. Cache Them If You Can (Steve Souders) — the percentage of resources that are cacheable has increased 4% during the past year. Over that same time the number of requests per page has increased 12% and total transfer size has increased 24%.
  2. Natural — MIT-licensed general natural language facility for nodejs. Tokenizing, stemming, classification, phonetics, tf-idf, WordNet, string similarity, and some inflection are currently supported. (via Javascript Weekly)
  3. How Millennials SearchStatistically significant findings suggest that millennial generation Web searchers proceed erratically through an information search process, make only a limited attempt to evaluate the quality or validity of information gathered, and may perform some level of ‘backfilling’ or adding sources to a research project before final submission of the work. Never let old people tell you that “digital natives” actually know what they’re doing.
  4. Walmart Buys A Facebook App for Calendar Access (Ars Technica) — The Social Calendar app and its file of 110 million birthdays and other events, acquired from Newput Corp., will give Walmart the ability to expand its efforts to dig deeper into the lives of customers. Interesting to think that by buying a well-loved app, a company could get access to your Facebook details whether you Like them or not.
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Four short links: 13 March 2012

Four short links: 13 March 2012

RoboTranslation, Basketball Visualization, Distributed Datasets, and UW's Open 3D Printing Lab Reopens

  1. Microsoft Universal Voice Translator — the promise is that it converts your voice into another language, but the effect is more that it converts your voice into that of Darth You in another language. Still, that’s like complaining that the first Wright Brothers flight didn’t serve peanuts. (via Hacker News)
  2. Geography of the Basketball Court — fascinating analytics of where NBA shooters make their shots from. Pretty pictures and sweet summaries even if you don’t follow basketball. (via Flowing Data)
  3. Spark Research — a programming model (“resilient distributed datasets”) for applications that reuse an intermediate result in multiple parallel operations. (via Ben Lorica)
  4. Opening Up — earlier I covered the problems that University of Washington’s 3D printing lab had with the university’s new IP policy, which prevented them from being as open as they had been. They’ve been granted the ability to distribute their work under Creative Commons license and are taking their place again as a hub of the emerging 3D printing world. (via BoingBoing)
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Visualization of the Week: Anachronistic language in "Downton Abbey"

Visualization of the Week: Anachronistic language in "Downton Abbey"

A look at the historical accuracy of "Downton Abbey's" language.

Ben Schmidt ran the script of the "Downton Abbey" season two finale through Google Ngrams to see how the show's language matches up with history.

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The paperless book

The paperless book

The problem for publishers is that customers don't know what a book is anymore.

The publishing world needs some new language that describes what happens and, more importantly, what is possible when the words are separated from the paper.

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Four short links: 6 September 2011

Four short links: 6 September 2011

Javascript Primitives, Test Backups, Learn Triples, and Scale Javascript

  1. The Secret Life of Javascript Primitives — good writing and clever headlines can make even the dullest topic seem interesting. This is interesting, I hasten to add.
  2. Backup Bouncer — software to test how effective your backup tools are: you copy files to a test area by whatever means you like, then run this tool to see whether permissions, flags, owners, contents, timestamps, etc. are preserved. (via Joshua Schachter)
  3. reVerb — open source (GPLv3) toolkit for learning triples from text. See the paper for more details.
  4. Patterns for Large-Scale Javascript Architecture — enterprise (aka “scalable”) architectures for Javascript apps.
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Four short links: 24 August 2011

Four short links: 24 August 2011

STM in Python, Static Web is Back, Cyberwar, and Virtual Language Education

  1. STM in PyPy — a proposal to add software transactional memory to the all-Python Python interpreter as a way of simplifying concurrent programming. I first learned about STM from Haskell’s Simon Peyton-Jones at OSCON. (via Nelson Minar)
  2. Werner Vogels’ Static Web Site on S3 — nice writeup of the toolchain to publish a web site to static files served from S3.
  3. China Inadvertently Reveals State-Sponsored Hacking — if UK, US, France, Israel, or Chinese citizens believe their government doesn’t have malware and penetration teams working on extracting information from foreign governments, they’re dreaming.
  4. MyChinese360 — virtual foreign language instruction in Mandarin, including “virtual visits” to Chinese landmarks. The ability to get native speakers virtually into the classroom makes the Internet a huge asset for rural schools. (via Lucy Gray)
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Four short links: 15 August 2011

Four short links: 15 August 2011

Illusions, Crowdsourcing, Translations, and Favourite Numbers

  1. Illusion Contest — every year they run an open contest for optical illusions. Every year new perceptual illusions are discovered, exploiting hitherto unresearched areas of our brain’s functioning.
  2. Citizen Science Alliance — the team behind GalaxyZoo, who help other researchers in need of crowdsourcing support.
  3. Ancient Lives — crowdsourced translation and reconstruction of ancient papyri from Oxyrhyncus, already found new gospels (in which the number of the beast is 616, not 666).
  4. Favourite Number — tell a story about your favourite number. Alex Bellos is behind it, and talked about the great stories he’s collected so far. Contribute now, watch this space to learn more about the stories.
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