ENTRIES TAGGED "microsoft kinect"

Four short links: 23 February 2012

Four short links: 23 February 2012

Why Mobile Matters, Towards Better Textbooks, Kinect Hack, and Greece Cantrepreneurial Spirit

  1. Why Mobile Matters (Luke Wroblewski) — great demonstration of the changes in desktop and mobile, the new power of Android, and the waning influence of old manufacturers.
  2. It’s Called iBooks Author Not iMathTextbooks Author, And The Trouble That Results (Dan Meyer) — It’s curious that even though students own their iBooks forever (ie. they can’t resell them or give them away), they can’t write in them except in the most cursory ways. Even curiouser, these iBooks could all be wired to the Internet and wired to a classroom through iTunes U, but they’d still be invisible to each other. Your work on your iPad cannot benefit me on mine. At our school, we look for “software with holes in it”–software into which kids put their own answers, photos, stories.
  3. DepthCamIt’s a live-streaming 3D point-cloud, carried over a binary WebSocket. It responds to movement in the scene by panning the (virtual) camera, and you can also pan and zoom around with the mouse. Very impressive hack with a Kinect! (via Pete Warden)
  4. Starting an Online Store is Not Easy in GreeceAt the health department, they were told that all the shareholders of the company would have to provide chest X-rays, and, in the most surreal demand of all, stool samples. Note to Greece: this is not how you check whether a business plan is full of shit. (via Hacker News)
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Developer Week in Review: A big moment for Kinect?

Developer Week in Review: A big moment for Kinect?

Microsoft wants to Kinect with Windows users, more junk patents, and free programming lessons are everywhere.

Microsoft thinks the Kinect has a bright future with the PC. Elsewhere, we have a new contender for worst software patent ever, and the mayor of New York City wants to get his geek on.

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Four short links: 14 April 2011

Four short links: 14 April 2011

HTML5 Demos, Resilience Engineering, Kinect SDK, and London Nerd Daytrips

  1. Chrome Experiment: ArcadeFire — choreographed windows, interactive flocking, custom rendered maps, real-time compositing, procedural drawing, 3D canvas rendering in HTML5. I have to say that “Built for Google Chrome” at the bottom does turn my stomach, a “this page looks best in Microsoft Internet Explorer” for the 2010s.
  2. Resilience Engineering, Part 1 (John Allspaw) — listing human error as a root cause isn’t where you should end, it’s where you should start your investigation [...] The idea that failures in complex systems can literally have a singular ‘root’ cause, as if failures are the result of linear steps in time, is just incorrect. Not only is it almost always incorrect, but in practice that perspective can be harmful to an organization because it allows management and others to feel better about improving safety, when they’re not, because the solution(s) can be viewed as simple and singular fixes (in reality, they’re not). It’s all must-read stuff. (via Mike Loukides)
  3. What’s in Microsoft’s Kineck SDKit does seem to include the new super body tracking software able to track up to two users at the same time and it also promises a new feature – the ability to listen. It has four microphones and there’s promise that, with the position information, it’ll be able to isolate your voice from background noise. (via Tim O’Reilly)
  4. Nerdy London Day Trips (Ben Goldacre) — hundreds more reasons to visit London (and then leave it). Includes abandoned nuclear bunkers, an “eccentric” Victorian philanthropist’s labyrinth of tunnels, and the first house in the world to be powered by hydro-electricity. (via Kari Stewart)
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