ENTRIES TAGGED "mit"

Joi Ito: “Deploy or Die”

Why everyone must understand manufacturing, and why the most creative companies design hardware and software together.

It was a pleasure, as always, to talk with Joi Ito a couple of weeks ago. He and I are co-chairing Solid, our new conference about the intersection of software and the physical world, and we recorded part of our conversation in the video below to frame the program we’ve assembled. Joi is, of course, the director of the MIT…
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Four short links: 12 November 2013

Four short links: 12 November 2013

Coding for Unreliability, AirBnB JS Style, Category Theory, and Text Processing

  1. Quantitative Reliability of Programs That Execute on Unreliable Hardware (MIT) — As MIT’s press release put it: Rely simply steps through the intermediate representation, folding the probability that each instruction will yield the right answer into an estimation of the overall variability of the program’s output. (via Pete Warden)
  2. AirBNB’s Javascript Style Guide (Github) — A mostly reasonable approach to JavaScript.
  3. Category Theory for Scientists (MIT Courseware) — Scooby snacks for rationalists.
  4. Textblob — Python open source text processing library with sentiment analysis, PoS tagging, term extraction, and more.
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Four short links: 11 February 2013

Four short links: 11 February 2013

Virtual Fences, State Fonts, Simple Prompts, and MIT Health Hackery

  1. How Virtual Fences Will Transform Rural America (The Atlantic) — When it comes to managing animals, every conventional fence that I have ever built has been in the wrong place the next year.
  2. Stately — a font of states which mesh together, so you can style individual states in CSS. Clever! (via Andy Baio)
  3. Code Triage — mails you a todo from your favourite Github projects. Interesting to see (a) what happens once there’s an easy way to access things like issues across multiple projects; and (b) what a lightweight hack it is for increasing participation. What small things could you send out each day, something different to each person, that’d help you make progress? Hm.
  4. MIT’s Health and Wellness Hack Day — 80 participants, two weeks. Good writeup in Fast Company. The focus here is on producing commercially viable products.
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Will online learning destroy America’s colleges?

Some parts of the American university system work well for their students. The rest are ready for disruption.

The American college system is staggeringly large: 2,421 four-year institutions enroll about 18.5 million college students. The proportion of Americans with a bachelor’s degree is at an all-time high — a social victory if they’re able to enjoy a positive return on their degrees, which the Pew Research Center estimates at about $550,000 on average. And the…
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Strata Week: MIT and Massachusetts bet on big data

Strata Week: MIT and Massachusetts bet on big data

MIT and Massachusetts plan a big data initiative, Cisco predicts the Internet's big data future.

MIT announces a big data research center, Cisco predicts the future of the Internet (in zettabytes), and open data startup Junar announces seed funding.

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Developer Week in Review: Adobe sends Flex to Apache

Developer Week in Review: Adobe sends Flex to Apache

Flex goes FLOSS, some cheap Pi, and brain on a chip.

Adobe just gave away Flex, a new single-board computer might dethrone Arduino as the tool of choice for makers, and researchers bring us a step closer to our robotic overlords.

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Four short links: 20 January 2011

Four short links: 20 January 2011

Javascript Code Editing, Sun's Open Source Projects, Emulators, and Online Classes

  1. Ajax Code Editor — MPL/GPL/LGPL-licensed Javascript code editor that can be embedded into web sites. This used to be Mozilla Skywriter which used to be Mozilla Bespin. (via Mozilla Labs blog)
  2. Sun A Year After: The Open Source Projects — roundup of what happened to Sun’s open source projects after the Oracle acquisition. It’s like the plague struck: some are dead, some are dying, some are fearful, others plough on resolutely.
  3. libcpu — open source library for emulating CPUs, built on llvm. (via a Stackoverflow answer on emulators)
  4. MIT Open Courseware Supports Independent Learners — they’ve taken some popular classes and made sure the material stands alone, by writing new material to replace references to closed/offline/etc. textbooks. OCW Scholar is not a distance-learning program, but rather educational materials provided for free without the support of an instructor or teaching assistant. The trade-off for this content-based approach without interaction is that OCW Scholar can be used by a very large audience for only the cost of digital distribution. How long until cheap teaching universities spring up, offering the MIT courseware with on-site TAs?
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Tracking the tech that will make government better

Tracking the tech that will make government better

Crowdsourcing, fraud detection, and open data tools were touted at a recent Senate hearing.

A hearing on innovative uses of technology in government examined stimulus spending transparency at Recovery.gov, fraud detection through open data analysis, and the potential of crowdsourcing.

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Three Paradoxes of the Internet Age – Part Three

Three Paradoxes of the Internet Age – Part Three

As we move from the "web of information" to the "web of people" (aka the Social Web) the output of all of this social participation is massive dossiers on individual behavior (your social network profiles, photos, location, status updates, searches etc.) and social activity. This loss of control over personal information is on a collision course with the law of unintended consequences Amidst this barrage of good news for how much power we wield in the transaction of commerce one has to wonder if we are giving away something quite precious in the bargain.

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