"MySQL" entries

Four short links: 21 October 2010

Four short links: 21 October 2010

MySQL as NoSQL, Handmade SLR, Mac App Store, and Datamining Privacy Workshop

  1. Using MysQL as NoSQL750,000+ qps on a commodity MySQL/InnoDB 5.1 server from remote web clients.
  2. Making an SLR Camera from Scratch — amazing piece of hardware devotion. (via hackaday.com)
  3. Mac App Store Guidelines — Apple announce an app store for the Macintosh, similar to its app store for iPhones and iPads. “Mac App” no longer means generic “program”, it has a new and specific meaning, a program that must be installed through the App store and which has limited functionality (only one can run at a time, it’s full-screen, etc.). The list of guidelines for what kinds of programs you can’t sell through the App Store is interesting. Many have good reasons to be, but It creates a store inside itself for selling or distributing other software (i.e., an audio plug-in store in an audio app) is pure greed. Some are afeared that the next step is to make the App store the only way to install apps on a Mac, a move that would drive me away. It would be a sad day for Mac-lovers if Microsoft were to be the more open solution than Apple. cf the Owner’s Manifesto.
  4. Privacy Aspects of Data Mining — CFP for an IEEE workshop in December. (via jschneider on Twitter)
Comments: 4
Four short links: 16 September 2010

Four short links: 16 September 2010

Javascript Terminal, Visual Query Explainer, New Google Courses, and Cloudtop Apps

  1. jsTerm — ANSI-capable telnet terminal built in HTML5 with Javascript, Websocket, and Node.js. (via waxpancake on Twitter)
  2. MySQL EXPLAINer — visualize the output of the MySQL EXPLAIN command. (via eonarts on Twitter)
  3. Google Code University — updated with new classes, including C++ and Android app development.
  4. Cloudtop Applications (Anil Dash) — Anil calling “trend” on multiplatform native apps with cloud storage. Another layer in the Web 2.0 story Tim’s been telling for years, with some interesting observations from Anil, such as: Cloudtop apps seem to use completely proprietary APIs, and nobody seems overly troubled by the fact they have purpose-built interfaces.
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Four short links: 1 July 2010

Four short links: 1 July 2010

Component Costs, Streaming Server, RC Parts, and MySQL SSD Goodness

  1. Conflict Minerals and Blood Tech (Joey Devilla) — electronic components have a human and environmental cost. I remember Saul Griffith asking me, “do you want to kill gorillas or dolphins?” for one component. Now we can add child militias and horrific rape to the list. (via Simon Willison)
  2. Meteor — an open source HTTP server that serves streaming data feeds (for apps that need Comet-style persistent connections). (via gianouts on Delicious)
  3. Hobby King RC Store — online source for remote control goodness, as recommended by Dan Shapiro at Foo.
  4. RethinkDB — MySQL storage engine optimised for SSD drives. See also TechCrunch article.
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Brian Aker on post-Oracle MySQL

A deep look at Oracle's motivations and MySQL's future

In time for next week’s MySQL Conference & Expo, Brian Aker discussed a number of topics with us, including Oracle’s motivations for buying Sun and the rise of NoSQL.

Comment: 1
Joe Stump on data, APIs, and why location is up for grabs

Joe Stump on data, APIs, and why location is up for grabs

The SimpleGEO CTO and former Digg architect discusses NoSQL and location's future

I recently had a long conversation with Joe Stump, CTO of SimpleGeo, about location, geodata, and the NoSQL movement. Stump, who was formerly lead architect at Digg, had a lot to say. Here’s the highlights, you can find the full interview elsewhere on Radar.

Comments: 6
Four short links: 17 March 2010

Four short links: 17 March 2010

MySQL, MySociety, NoSQL DB, and NoSQL Conference Notes

  1. Common MySQL Queries — a useful reference.
  2. MySociety’s Next 12 Months — two new projects, FixMyTransport and “Project Fosbury”. The latter is a more general tool to help people organise their own campaigns for change.
  3. riak — scalable key-value store with JSON interface. (via joshua on Delicious)
  4. Notes from NoSQL Live Boston — full of juicy nuggets of info from the NoSQL conference.
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MySQL migration and risk management

MySQL migration and risk management

Database expert Ronald Bradford on the pros and cons of migrating from Oracle to MySQL

Ronald Bradford has been guiding DBAs through key aspects of database integration for years. In this Q&A, he discusses the pros and cons of migrating from Oracle to MySQL (hint: it's not just about cost savings). He also weighs in on how Oracle's acquisition of Sun will shape the future of MySQL and its community.

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Four short links: 11 January 2010 Four short links: 11 January 2010

Four short links: 11 January 2010

Top for MySQL, Project Surprises, and Two Odd Little Programming Languages

  1. mytop — a MySQL top implementation to show you why your server is so damn slow right now.
  2. What Could Kill Elegant High-Value Participatory Project?The problem was not that the system was buggy or hard to use, but that it disrupted staff expectations and behavior. It introduced new challenges for staff [...]. Rather than adapt to these challenges, they removed the system. [...] No librarian would get rid of all the Harry Potter books because they are “too popular.” No museum would stop offering an educational program that was “too successful.” These are familiar challenges that come with the job and are seen to have benefit. But if tagging creates a line or people spend too much time giving you feedback? Staff at Haarlem Oost likely felt comfortable removing the tagging shelves because they didn’t see the tagging as a patron requirement, nor the maintenance of the shelves as part of their job.
  3. Gremlina Turing-complete, graph-based programming language developed in Java 1.6+ for key/value-pair multi-relational graphs known as property graphs. Graph structures underly a lot of interesting data (citations, social networks, maps) and this is a sign that we’re inching towards better systems for working with those graphs. (via Hacker News)
  4. Anic — programming language based on stream and latches. I still can’t figure out whether it’s an elaborate April Fool’s Day joke that was released too soon, because the claim of “easier than *sh” is a bold one given the double-backslash and double-square-bracket-heavy syntax of the language. Important because it’s built to be parallelised, and we’re in transition pain right now between well-understood predictable languages for single CPUs (with hacks like pthreads for scaling) and experimental languages for multiple CPUs.
Comments: 4
Four short links: 26 October 2009

Four short links: 26 October 2009

Data Exploration, Evidence-Based Coding, API to the English Language, Dual Licensing

  1. Toiling in the Data Mines — Tom Armitage describes the process that Berg calls “material exploration”. Programmers very rarely talk about what their work feels like to do, and that’s a shame. Material explorations are something I’ve really only done since I’ve joined BERG, and both times have felt very similar – in that they were very, very different to writing production code for an understood product. They demand code to be used as a sculpting tool, rather than as an engineering material, and I wanted to explain the knock-on effects of that: not just in terms of what I do, and the kind of code that’s appropriate for that, but also in terms of how I feel as I work on these explorations. Even if the section on the code itself feels foreign, I hope that the explanation of what it feels like is understandable.
  2. Bits of Evidence — Slides for a talk, “What we actually know about software development and why we believe it is true”. (via Simon Willison)
  3. Wordnik API — definitions, frequencies, examples APIs. See the announcement from the Web 2.0 Summit.
  4. The Peculiar Institution of Dual Licensing — Brian Aker eloquently describes why he feels that dual licensing is anti-open source. Brian obviously has considerable experience informing this opinion–his years as Director of Technology for MySQL.
Comments: 4
Four short links: 5 October 2009

Four short links: 5 October 2009

Bozo Cloud Talk, Annotation Fail(ish), Python MySQL Slash, and Infinite Books

  1. Brown Cloud Marketing — advertorial “interviewing” GM of a company offering “DNS in the cloud”. This might be a worthwhile service, but the way he markets it (by saying open source is “freeware” and the market leader is “legacy”) reveals a rich vein of bozo. Freeware legacy DNS is the internet’s dirty little secret (actually, it’s the reason we have a functioning DNS), Nominum software was written 100 percent from the ground up, and by having software with source code that is not open for everybody to look at, it is inherently more secure. (security through obscurity is equating clothing with being naked yet blind). The Internet kindly did the poor man’s homework: screenshot of a cross-site scripting vulnerability in their customer portal, a Nominum security advisory from 2008, and the Nominum web server is running Linux, Apache, and PHP (all legacy freeware yet apparently not the Internet’s dirty little secret). (via Bert Hubert and Securosis)
  2. Public Annotations on Healthcare Bill — using technology from SharedBook, Congressman Culberson hoped to get citizens marking up the healthcare bill. They’re using the software but many are just commenting on page 1–turning the hosted annotation platform into a forum with an odd user interface. It’s a UI challenge: designing a way to let focused people comment on specific things, while also permitting impatient unfocused people to comment on the general topic. It’s like asking for a SmartCar that seats 80. See also OpenCongress and their annotation system which also has hundreds of comments on the first few lines of the bill (including 39 on the one line “111th Congress”–apparently more contentious than you’d think!).
  3. MyConnPy — pure-Python MySQL client library, useful because it requires no C compilation to install (and thus can work on systems without C compilers installed, e.g. mobile). (via Simon Willison)
  4. The Infinite Book — design concept for an ebook reader (not a product you can buy yet). Sexy. (via Gizmodo)
Comments: 2