"open source hardware" entries

DARPA and Defense Department look to a more open source future

Retired General James E. Cartwright says the future of warfare needs better human-machine interfaces and adaptable platforms.

As the United States military marches further into the age of networked warfare, data networks and the mobile platforms to distribute and access them will become even more important.

Open Source Uncle SamThis fall, the (retired) eighth Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff described a potential future of the military that’s founded not only in open source thinking, but in next-generation user interfaces and biohacking straight out of science fiction. If even some of the strategic thinking he described at this year’s Military Open Source Conference in D.C. is applied to how the technology that supports the next generation of war fighters is built, dramatic evolutionary changes could cascade down the entire supply chain of one of the world’s biggest organizations.

In his remarks, James E. “Hoss” Cartwright, a four-star general who retired from the United States Marine Corps in August 2011, outlined a strategic need to make military technology more modular, based upon open standards and adaptable on the battlegrounds of the future.

Cartwright, the first holder of the Harold Brown Chair in Defense Policy Studies for the Center for Strategic & International Studies, a member of the Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee, and an adviser to several corporate entities in the defense industry, is well placed to have an informed and influential opinion.

Over the course of his talk at the Military Open Source Conference, Cartwright outlined how open source software models could be applied to hardware, making vehicles into adaptable platforms for different missions, not vertically integrated programs that can take a decade or longer to design, build or change. Read more…

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Ada Lovelace Day: Revisiting Limor Fried

Last year, for Ada Lovelace Day, I wrote a post about why I admire Limor Fried, the founder and CEO of Adafruit Industries. This year, I thought I'd talk about Limor again, both because she is such a great example of the engineer/entrepreneur, and because she's working in an emerging area that still isn't being taken as seriously as it…

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Nebula looks to democratize cloud computing with open source hardware

Nebula looks to democratize cloud computing with open source hardware

By combining OpenStack with Facebook's OpenCompute project, Nebula could bring cloud computing to everyone.

Newly launched Nebula will combine open source software with open source hardware developed into an appliance. If Nebula succeeds, its "cloud controller" could enable every company to implement cloud computing.

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Four short links: 16 November 2010

Four short links: 16 November 2010

Preserving History, Jimmy's Thousand Edit Stare, Maker Businesses, and Mobile Javascript

  1. A Room to Let in Old Aldgate — a lovely collection of photographs of lost buildings from The Society for Photographing Relics of Old London. Think of them as the Wayback Machine of their day. (via Fiona Rigby on Twitter)
  2. Wikipedia Fundraising A/B Tests — get a glimpse into the science that resulted in Jimmy Wales’s hollow haunted gaze staring at you with the eerie intensity of a creepy hobo talking about how tasty human liver is.
  3. It Takes A Lot of Money to Stay in Business (Ponoko) — guest blogs by Chris Anderson on the lessons and rules of maker businesses. Most Maker businesses that I’ve talked to have to hold parts inventory closer to 25% of their annual sales.
  4. Sencha Touch — mobile multitouch Javascript toolkit, now fully GPLed. (via Simon St Laurent)
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