ENTRIES TAGGED "Oracle"

Oracle's NoSQL

Oracle's NoSQL Database is more than a product. It's also an acknowledgement.

Oracle's announcement of a NoSQL product isn't just a validation of key-value stores, but of the entire discussion of database architecture.

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Strata Week: Oracle's big data play

Strata Week: Oracle's big data play

Oracle unveils its big data appliance, the Hadoop community gauges contributions.

In this week's data news, Oracle unveils its big data strategy, and Cloudera looks at the contributions to the Hadoop core and community.

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Four short links: 4 October 2011

Four short links: 4 October 2011

Singaporean Incubator, Oracle NoSQL, Should Facebook have a Browser?, and GitHub has Competition

  1. jfdi.asia — Singaporean version of TechStars, with 100-day program (“the bootcamp”) Jan-Apr 2012. Startups from anywhere in the world can apply, and will want to because Singapore is the gateway to Asia. They’ll also have mentors from around the world.
  2. Oracle NoSQLdb — Oracle want to sell you a distributed key-value store. It’s called “Oracle NoSQL” (as opposed to PostgreSQL, which is SQL No-Oracle). (via Edd Dumbill)
  3. Facebook Browser — interesting thoughts about why the browser might be a good play for Facebook. I’m not so sure: browsers don’t lend themselves to small teams, and search advertising doesn’t feel like a good fit with Facebook’s existing work. Still, making me grumpy again to see browsers become weapons again.
  4. Bitbucket — a competitor to Github, from the folks behind the widely-respected Jira and Confluence tools. I’m a little puzzled, to be honest: Github doesn’t seem to have weak spots (the way, for example, that Sourceforge did).
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Oracle's Big Data Appliance: what it means

Hadoop and R are the new industry standards

Today, Oracle announced their Big Data Appliance. It couldn't be a plainer validation of what's important in big data right now, or where the battle for technology dominance lies.

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Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft

Developer Week in Review: Android proves fruitful for Microsoft

More bucks for Microsoft, more horsepower for SPARC, and more votes for ... someone.

Samsung agrees to pay Microsoft royalties for Android use. Elsewhere, Oracle keeps the SPARC line alive, and the hackability of voting machines is exposed.

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Developer Week in Review: webSOS

Developer Week in Review: webSOS

HP bails, Oracle fails, and the UK teaches coding (including Wales).

WebOS is going to the great operating system repository in the sky, Oracle finds yet another way to peeve developers, and the UK tries to create a new generation of programmers.

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Developer Week in Review: iPhone 5 is still on hold

Developer Week in Review: iPhone 5 is still on hold

Waiting for iPhone 5, patent madness continues, and the geeks will soon descend on New York.

We've been waiting for months, but the iPhone 5 is still getting ready. Elsewhere, Google lends HTC some ammo for the patent wars, and the Makers will soon gather in New York.

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Developer Week in Review: Lion drops pre-installed MySQL

Developer Week in Review: Lion drops pre-installed MySQL

MySQL is missing from Lion Server, and Apple gets a slap on the wrist from South Korea.

A pre-installed version of MySQL is noticeably absent from Lion Server, South Korea penalizes Apple for the location brouhaha, and Java 7's compiler injects a bit of randomness into software development.

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Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0

Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0

The Linux kernel gets to 3.0, Oracle is bitten by the Internet's long memory, and more lawsuit fever.

The Linux kernel gets to version 3.0. Meanwhile, Oracle doesn't seem to remember the warm reception that Sun gave Android, and big players get lawsuits on their doorsteps.

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Who leads the Java parade?

Who leads the Java parade?

Oracle, Google, and VMware are all Java players, but a clear leader has yet to emerge.

Are any of the companies in the Java community willing to exercise technical
leadership? Are there organizations willing to bring the features Java needs to fruition? It's time for the real leader to stand up and address these questions.

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