"patents" entries

Four short links: 14 February 2012

Four short links: 14 February 2012

Corruption Remains, Automated Instruction, Eolas Victory Incomplete, and CI Arduino Hack

  1. Why I Hate The STOCK Act (Clay Johnson) — an attempt to reform insider trading within government, but because Congress exempts itself from substantial penalties then it has little effect where it’s needed most. We won’t see change on the issues that matter to us (copyright, due process for Internet takedowns, privacy, etc.) while the lawmakers are distracted by money.
  2. Instruction Medium is the Message (Dan Meyer) — Print is a medium. Same as digital photos. Same as a teacher’s voice. Same as a YouTube video. Same as a podcast. These are all different media. And as we know, the medium is the message. The medium defines and constrains and sometimes distorts the message. The math that can be conveyed in a YouTube video is not the same math that can be conveyed in a digital photo or a podcast or a print textbook. Anything that can be replaced by a computer should be; it’s doubtful that successful widespread education consists only of things a computer can replace.
  3. Eolas Patent a Hollow Victory (Simon Phipps) — those who were extorted by the patent troll will go uncompensated, and the loss of one patent leaves their business model still intact. The patent system is extremely broken in the US, it’s a giant cost of doing business, a regulation-created tax that is paid to trolls instead of to the US Government. What idiot supports a tax that doesn’t go to the government? An ethically-corrupted one (see point 1 above).
  4. Monitor your Continuous Integration Server with Traffic Lights and an Arduino — nifty little hardware hack. It’s an example of making physical objects which control or portray virtual systems, and it’s tied into this Continuous Integration trend whereby software changes go live as soon as possible rather than being held off until 2am on the first Thursday of the month, when the IT team come in to manage the rollout of the new code. CI, in turn, is an example of failing early on something small rather than failing later and larger. (via Sandy Mamoli)
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Developer Week in Review: A pause to consider patents

Developer Week in Review: A pause to consider patents

There was good news and bad news on the intellectual property front this week.

We take a look at two major events that rocked the technology intellectual property wars, centered on a courtroom in Texas and a standards body a continent away.

Comments: 5
Jury to Eolas: Nobody owns the interactive web

Jury to Eolas: Nobody owns the interactive web

A decision to strike down patents to the "Interactive Web" is an important victory for the networked commons.

A Texas jury has struck down a company's claim to ownership of the interactive web. Eolas, which has been suing technology companies for more than a decade, now faces the prospect of losing the patents.

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Publishing News: Tech patent wars spill into the book world

Publishing News: Tech patent wars spill into the book world

B&N takes issue with Microsoft's patents, Congress held a SOPA hearing, and authors decry Amazon's Lending Library.

B&N’s position against Microsoft was made public, causing quite a dust-up. Also, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) hearing was as controversial as the Act itself, and the Authors Guild says the Kindle Owner’s Lending Library breaches contracts.

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Four short links: 17 November 2011

Four short links: 17 November 2011

University Relevance, Free as in Dom, Patent Trolls, and Facebook Teams

  1. Questioning University — my take on the issue of whether a university education (particularly CS) is still relevant or whether kids should go straight to startups. So what do I tell my kids? Should I urge them to go to university? Should I tell them to jack it all in and run off and join a startup? This is what’s occupying my mind now.
  2. Still Cripped by Free (Simon Phipps) — the freedoms of free and open software (the ability to use it for whatever you want, to improve it or give it to others who can then improve it) represent creative and financial independence. Fifteen years after open source and business really started to get dirty with each other, the misunderstanding is still widespread that it’s about price. Simon has a clear and robust essay about the latest UK procurement guidelines to show why price can be subverted in a way that freedom cannot.
  3. The Private and Social Costs of Patent TrollsUsing stock market event studies around patent lawsuit filings, we find that NPE lawsuits are associated with half a trillion dollars of lost wealth to defendants from 1990 through 2010, mostly from technology companies. Moreover, very little of this loss represents a transfer to small inventors. Instead, it implies reduced innovation incentives. (via BoingBoing)
  4. Facebook’s Teams and Use of Data — great talk by Adam Mosseri of Facebook, where he covers the composition of teams at Facebook, how they use data to make decisions, and when they don’t use data to make decisions. (via Bryce Roberts)
Comments: 3
Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0

Developer Week in Review: Linux turns the big 3.0

The Linux kernel gets to 3.0, Oracle is bitten by the Internet's long memory, and more lawsuit fever.

The Linux kernel gets to version 3.0. Meanwhile, Oracle doesn't seem to remember the warm reception that Sun gave Android, and big players get lawsuits on their doorsteps.

Comment: 1
Top stories: July 18-22, 2011

Top stories: July 18-22, 2011

Google+ is a social backbone, how to fix the patent mess, and programming well with others.

This week on O'Reilly: We examined the deeper and broader implications of Google+, four solutions to the patent quagmire were offered up, and we learned about the "art of mass organizational manipulation."

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Developer Week in Review: Mobile’s embedded irony

Developer Week in Review: Mobile’s embedded irony

Who really profits from Android sales? And does the world need another source control system?

Microsoft profits from Google's toils, why you shouldn't put older developers out to pasture, and a new source control system enters the fray.

Comment: 1
Developer Week in Review: Mobile's embedded irony

Developer Week in Review: Mobile's embedded irony

Who really profits from Android sales? And does the world need another source control system?

Microsoft profits from Google's toils, why you shouldn't put older developers out to pasture, and a new source control system enters the fray.

Comment: 1
Intellectual property gone mad

Intellectual property gone mad

Sweeping patent changes aren't likely, but small solutions may curb patent trolls.

Patent trolling could undermine app ecosystems, but who can mount a legitimate challenge? Here's four potential solutions.

Comments: 11