ENTRIES TAGGED "performance"

Theo Schlossnagle on DevOps as a career

Theo Schlossnagle on DevOps as a career

A day in the life of DevOps, and the skills you'll need to enter the field.

In this Velocity podcast, OmniTI CEO Theo Schlossnagle discusses the skills of DevOps professionals and knowing how you've achieved excellence in the field.

Comment
Giving the Velocity website a performance makeover

Giving the Velocity website a performance makeover

Four simple optimization steps produce big results.

Learn how producers slimmed down the Velocity conference site, cutting the site's load time by 3.5 seconds and dropping 49% of the page weight.

Comments: 3

Velocity Profile: Sergey Chernyshev

Web ops and performance questions with Sergey Chernyshev.

A profile of web operations and performance expert Sergey Chernyshev, director of web systems and applications at truTV and organizer of the New York Web Performance Meetup Group.

Comment
Joshua Bixby on the business of performance

Joshua Bixby on the business of performance

Why businesses should care about speed.

In this Velocity Podcast, Strangeloop's Joshua Bixby discusses the business of speed and why web performance optimization is an institutional need.

Comment
Steve Souders on Web Performance Optimization

Steve Souders on Web Performance Optimization

Why "even faster" matters in the web performance and optimization world.

Steve Souders on the state of web performance, optimization and velocity.

Comments: 7

Velocity Profile: Hooman Beheshti

Web ops and performance questions with Hooman Beheshti, VP of technology at Strangeloop.

Hooman Beheshti, the vice president of technology at Strangeloop, talks about how he got into web ops and performance, the biggest problems he's encountered, and the tools he relies on most.

Comment
Four short links: 23 March 2012

Four short links: 23 March 2012

Caching Pages, Node NLP, Digital Native are Clueless, and Wal-Mart Loves Your Calendar

  1. Cache Them If You Can (Steve Souders) — the percentage of resources that are cacheable has increased 4% during the past year. Over that same time the number of requests per page has increased 12% and total transfer size has increased 24%.
  2. Natural — MIT-licensed general natural language facility for nodejs. Tokenizing, stemming, classification, phonetics, tf-idf, WordNet, string similarity, and some inflection are currently supported. (via Javascript Weekly)
  3. How Millennials SearchStatistically significant findings suggest that millennial generation Web searchers proceed erratically through an information search process, make only a limited attempt to evaluate the quality or validity of information gathered, and may perform some level of ‘backfilling’ or adding sources to a research project before final submission of the work. Never let old people tell you that “digital natives” actually know what they’re doing.
  4. Walmart Buys A Facebook App for Calendar Access (Ars Technica) — The Social Calendar app and its file of 110 million birthdays and other events, acquired from Newput Corp., will give Walmart the ability to expand its efforts to dig deeper into the lives of customers. Interesting to think that by buying a well-loved app, a company could get access to your Facebook details whether you Like them or not.
Comment
Four short links: 21 March 2012

Four short links: 21 March 2012

Data Journalism, Fast Web Servers, Android App Inventor, and Daily Deal Dirt

  1. S0rce — gorgeous infographics. They purport to let you Think for Yourself which is bald-faced bullshit: the choice of which data to present, and the invisible collection and curation practices behind the data, is the choice of what story to tell and what it will say. That said, it’s wonderful to see the numbers (and they are attributed) behind the Republican Primary and Copyright and Piracy Legislation.
  2. Modern HTTP Servers are Fast — I remember when the best web engineering in the world would still fall over if a box got more than 10 hits/second. Yes, yes, I’m writing this on my grandpa box. Check out the hardware specs of the box these numbers are from.
  3. MIT App Inventor — web-based app designer. Does not appear to be open source. There is no long-term sustainability for this kind of development environment: when MIT decide “nah screw it, not going to run this any more” or “hmm, maybe we’ll charge for it”, you’re boned–you can download the “source” to your app in a zip file but AppInventor is the only dev environment which can consume it. I hope it’ll become the awesome and easy dev environment that Android needs, but I hope they prevent it from being a dead end.
  4. Daily Deals: Prediction, Social Diffusion, and Reputational Ramificationswe consider the effects of daily deals on the longer-term reputation of merchants, based on their Yelp reviews before and after they run a daily deal. Our analysis shows that while the number of reviews increases significantly due to daily deals, average rating scores from reviewers who mention daily deals are 10% lower than scores of their peers on average. (via Greg Linden)
Comments: 3
Four short links: 2 March 2012

Four short links: 2 March 2012

Robotics for Kids, Benchmarking Context Needed, Javascript Time Series Graphs, and Amazing Programming Video

  1. Interview: Hanno Sander on Robotics (Circuit Cellar) — this is what Mindstorms wants to be when it grows up. AAA++ for teaching kids. Hanno is a Kiwi Foo Camper.
  2. Context Needed: BenchmarksBenchmarks fall into a few common traps because of under-reporting in context and lack of detail in results. The typical benchmark report doesn’t reveal the benchmark’s goal, full details of the hardware and software used, how the results were edited if at all, how to reproduce the results, detailed reporting on the system’s performance during the test, and an interpretation and explanation of the results. (via Jesse Robbins)
  3. Morris.js (GitHub) — a lightweight library that uses jQuery and Raphaël to make drawing time-series graphs easy.
  4. Bret Victor: Inventing on Principle (Vimeo) — the first 20m has amazing demos of a coding environment with realtime feedback. Must see this! (via Sacha Judd)
Comment: 1
Four short links: 21 February 2012

Four short links: 21 February 2012

jQuery Performance, George Dyson, VLC 2.0, and Power Laws

  1. Stop Paying Your jQuery Tax (Sam Saffron) — performance advice for front-end developers. The faster your site responds, the more customers will use it.
  2. George Dyson Interviewed (Wired) — a different perspective on computing, worth reading.
  3. VLC 2.0.0 — VLC lets you bypass manufacturers’ designed-in brokenness so your computer can play media. Glad to see it still being actively developed.
  4. Critical Truth About Power Laws (Science Magazine) — Although power laws have been reported in areas ranging from finance and molecular biology to geophysics and the Internet, the data are typically insufficient and the mechanistic insights are almost always too limited for the identification of power-law behavior to be scientifically useful (see the figure). Indeed, even most statistically “successful” calculations of power laws offer little more than anecdotal value. (no PDF available unless you pay, because that’s how great science works)
Comments: 2